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Article: Coping strategies used by children hospitalized with cancer: an exploratory study.

TitleCoping strategies used by children hospitalized with cancer: an exploratory study.
Authors
KeywordsCancer
Children
Chinese
Coping strategy
Oncology
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2011, v. 20 n. 9, p. 969-976 How to Cite?
AbstractThe treatment of cancer is a stressful and threatening experience, particularly for children. Knowing how children cope with cancer is a crucial step toward designing appropriate psychological interventions that help them ease the burden of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the coping strategies used by Chinese children hospitalized with cancer, an area of research that is under-represented in the existing literature. Hong Kong Chinese children (9-16-year olds) admitted for cancer treatment to the pediatric oncology units of two different regional acute public hospitals were invited to participate. A short one-to-one structured interview was conducted with each participant. Content analysis was conducted to analyze the interview data. A convenience sample of 88 children was recruited and participated in the interviews during an 8-month period. The coping strategies used by Chinese children hospitalized with cancer did not differ according to gender and diagnosis, but only according to age, with younger children using less problem-focused and more emotion-focused coping strategies than older children. The overall results indicated that 30% of these Chinese patients used problem-focused coping strategies, while 70% used emotion-focused coping. Findings from this study indicated that children use different coping strategies at different developmental stages. The study also revealed that Chinese children used more emotion-focused than problem-focused coping strategies than their Western counterparts. The information derived from this study will help health-care professionals design and shape appropriate psychological interventions that can help reduce the burden of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126485
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, HCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, OKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:31:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:31:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2011, v. 20 n. 9, p. 969-976en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1099-1611en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126485-
dc.description.abstractThe treatment of cancer is a stressful and threatening experience, particularly for children. Knowing how children cope with cancer is a crucial step toward designing appropriate psychological interventions that help them ease the burden of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the coping strategies used by Chinese children hospitalized with cancer, an area of research that is under-represented in the existing literature. Hong Kong Chinese children (9-16-year olds) admitted for cancer treatment to the pediatric oncology units of two different regional acute public hospitals were invited to participate. A short one-to-one structured interview was conducted with each participant. Content analysis was conducted to analyze the interview data. A convenience sample of 88 children was recruited and participated in the interviews during an 8-month period. The coping strategies used by Chinese children hospitalized with cancer did not differ according to gender and diagnosis, but only according to age, with younger children using less problem-focused and more emotion-focused coping strategies than older children. The overall results indicated that 30% of these Chinese patients used problem-focused coping strategies, while 70% used emotion-focused coping. Findings from this study indicated that children use different coping strategies at different developmental stages. The study also revealed that Chinese children used more emotion-focused than problem-focused coping strategies than their Western counterparts. The information derived from this study will help health-care professionals design and shape appropriate psychological interventions that can help reduce the burden of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectCancer-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectCoping strategy-
dc.subjectOncology-
dc.titleCoping strategies used by children hospitalized with cancer: an exploratory study.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1057-9249&volume=&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Coping+Strategies+Used+By+Children+Hospitalized+With+cancer:+An+Exploratory+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, HC: william3@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, OK: joychung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, HC=rp00528en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, OK=rp00250en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1805-
dc.identifier.pmid20662105en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861812769en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros176336en_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage969en_HK
dc.identifier.epage976en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1611-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295122700008-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, HC=8973660200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, OK=26321415000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, KY=54882872200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, SY=37012041700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLopez, V=7103022537en_HK

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