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Article: Breast-feeding and childhood hospitalizations for infections

TitleBreast-feeding and childhood hospitalizations for infections
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2010, v. 21 n. 6, p. 847-854 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Infectious disease is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization for infants and children. During infancy, breast-feeding protects against infectious diseases, particularly respiratory infections, gastrointestinal infections, and otitis media. Little is known about the longer-term impact of breast-feeding on infectious disease in children. Methods: We investigated the relationship between infant feeding and childhood hospitalizations from respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in a population-based birth cohort of 8327 children born in 1997 and followed for 8 years. The main outcomes were public hospital admissions for respiratory infections, gastrointestinal infections, and all infectious diseases. Cox regression was used to assess time to first hospitalization. Results: Breast-feeding only (no formula-feeding) for 3 or more months was associated with a lower risk of hospital admission in the first 6 months of life for respiratory infections (hazard ratio = 0.64 [95% confidence interval = 0.42-0.97]), gastrointestinal infections (0.51 [0.25-1.05]), and any infection (0.61 [0.44-0.85]), adjusted for sex, type of hospital at birth, and household income. Partial breast-feeding (both breast-feeding and formula-feeding) in the first 3 months also reduced hospitalizations from infections but with smaller effect sizes. Beyond 6 months of age, there was no association between breast-feeding status at 3 months and hospitalization for infectious disease. Conclusions: Giving breast milk and no formula for at least 3 months substantially reduced hospital admissions for many infectious diseases in the first 6 months of life, when children are most vulnerable. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126482
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region06060592
04050172
Hong Kong Health Care216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund03040711
University of Hong Kong10206700
Funding Information:

Supported by the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Grants: 06060592, 04050172); the Hong Kong Health Care and Promotion Fund (Grant: 216106); the Health and Health Services Research Fund (Grant: 03040711); and the University of Hong Kong (Grant: 10206700).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:31:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:31:14Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2010, v. 21 n. 6, p. 847-854en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126482-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Infectious disease is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization for infants and children. During infancy, breast-feeding protects against infectious diseases, particularly respiratory infections, gastrointestinal infections, and otitis media. Little is known about the longer-term impact of breast-feeding on infectious disease in children. Methods: We investigated the relationship between infant feeding and childhood hospitalizations from respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in a population-based birth cohort of 8327 children born in 1997 and followed for 8 years. The main outcomes were public hospital admissions for respiratory infections, gastrointestinal infections, and all infectious diseases. Cox regression was used to assess time to first hospitalization. Results: Breast-feeding only (no formula-feeding) for 3 or more months was associated with a lower risk of hospital admission in the first 6 months of life for respiratory infections (hazard ratio = 0.64 [95% confidence interval = 0.42-0.97]), gastrointestinal infections (0.51 [0.25-1.05]), and any infection (0.61 [0.44-0.85]), adjusted for sex, type of hospital at birth, and household income. Partial breast-feeding (both breast-feeding and formula-feeding) in the first 3 months also reduced hospitalizations from infections but with smaller effect sizes. Beyond 6 months of age, there was no association between breast-feeding status at 3 months and hospitalization for infectious disease. Conclusions: Giving breast milk and no formula for at least 3 months substantially reduced hospital admissions for many infectious diseases in the first 6 months of life, when children are most vulnerable. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Epidemiology, 2010, v. 21 n. 6, p. 847-854-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBreast Feeding-
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshInfection - classification - epidemiology - therapy-
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology-
dc.titleBreast-feeding and childhood hospitalizations for infectionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1044-3983&volume=21&issue=6&spage=847&epage=854&date=2010&atitle=Breast-feeding+and+Childhood+Hospitalizations+for+Infectionsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, M: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, M=rp00461en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181f55803en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20864890-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958472334en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182468en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77958472334&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage847en_HK
dc.identifier.epage854en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1531-5487-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282600600016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectImpact of breastfeeding on hospitalizations from infectious diseases in Hong Kong Chinese children up to eight years of age-
dc.relation.projectInfectious illness and secondhand smoke exposure in utero and during the first 8 years of life-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTarrant, M=7004340118en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, MK=12806220300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK

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