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Article: Coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: Development and psychometric testing

TitleCoping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: Development and psychometric testing
Authors
KeywordsCoping behaviour checklist for Chinese children
Instrument development
Nursing
Psychometric testing
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 2010, v. 66 n. 7, p. 1633-1643 How to Cite?
Abstractli h.c.w., chung o.k.j., wong m.l.e. & ho k.y. (2010) Coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: development and psychometric testing. Journal of Advanced Nursing 66(7), 1633-1643. Title.: Coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: development and psychometric testing. Aim.: This paper is a report of development and psychometric testing of the coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children. Background.: An understanding of the coping behaviour of children is an essential prerequisite for the design of an appropriate psychological intervention to enhance children's ability to cope with stressful medical procedures and hospitalization. Review of literature reveals that there is lack of child-sensitive measurement tools in the Chinese culture for assessing coping behaviours of children with good psychometric properties. Methods.: An instrument development and validation study was conducted. Phase 1 was designed to develop a checklist of coping behaviour for Chinese children, while in phase 2 the psychometric properties of the new scale were tested. A total of 168 (phase 1) and 236 (phase 2) children between the ages of 7 and 12 years, were invited to participate in this study in 2008 and 2009, respectively; 228 completed both phases of data collection. Results.: On the basis of the results of qualitative interview data, the coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children was developed. The newly developed scale had adequate internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability, high content validity and appropriate construct validity. Confirmatory factor analysis further added evidence of the construct validity of the scale. Conclusion.: The instrument can be used to identify the coping behaviour of Hong Kong Chinese children aged between 7 and 12 years. Knowing the coping behaviour of children in advance can help nurses to shape and design appropriate psychological interventions that can help children better cope with stressful medical procedures and hospitalization. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126479
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, HCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, OKJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MLEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:31:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:31:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Advanced Nursing, 2010, v. 66 n. 7, p. 1633-1643en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126479-
dc.description.abstractli h.c.w., chung o.k.j., wong m.l.e. & ho k.y. (2010) Coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: development and psychometric testing. Journal of Advanced Nursing 66(7), 1633-1643. Title.: Coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: development and psychometric testing. Aim.: This paper is a report of development and psychometric testing of the coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children. Background.: An understanding of the coping behaviour of children is an essential prerequisite for the design of an appropriate psychological intervention to enhance children's ability to cope with stressful medical procedures and hospitalization. Review of literature reveals that there is lack of child-sensitive measurement tools in the Chinese culture for assessing coping behaviours of children with good psychometric properties. Methods.: An instrument development and validation study was conducted. Phase 1 was designed to develop a checklist of coping behaviour for Chinese children, while in phase 2 the psychometric properties of the new scale were tested. A total of 168 (phase 1) and 236 (phase 2) children between the ages of 7 and 12 years, were invited to participate in this study in 2008 and 2009, respectively; 228 completed both phases of data collection. Results.: On the basis of the results of qualitative interview data, the coping behaviour checklist for Chinese children was developed. The newly developed scale had adequate internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability, high content validity and appropriate construct validity. Confirmatory factor analysis further added evidence of the construct validity of the scale. Conclusion.: The instrument can be used to identify the coping behaviour of Hong Kong Chinese children aged between 7 and 12 years. Knowing the coping behaviour of children in advance can help nurses to shape and design appropriate psychological interventions that can help children better cope with stressful medical procedures and hospitalization. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_HK
dc.subjectCoping behaviour checklist for Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.subjectInstrument developmenten_HK
dc.subjectNursingen_HK
dc.subjectPsychometric testingen_HK
dc.titleCoping behaviour checklist for Chinese children: Development and psychometric testingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0309-2402&volume=66&issue=7&spage=1633&epage=1643&date=2010&atitle=Coping+Behaviour+Checklist+For+Chinese+Children:+Development+and+Psychometric+Testingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, HCW: william3@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, OKJ: joychung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, MLE: eliza07@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, HCW=rp00528en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, OKJ=rp00250en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MLE=rp00529en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05358.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20497265-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954198374en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros176329en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954198374&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume66en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1633en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1643en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279406700022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, HCW=8973660200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, OKJ=26321415000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MLE=13205136500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, KY=36174800600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7323137-

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