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Article: Electrospinning of fibrous polymer scaffolds using positive voltage or negative voltage: A comparative study

TitleElectrospinning of fibrous polymer scaffolds using positive voltage or negative voltage: A comparative study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/BMM
Citation
Biomedical Materials, 2010, v. 5 n. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractElectrospinning of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds has been traditionally conducted using positive voltages. In the current study, positive voltage (PV) electrospinning and negative voltage (NV) electrospinning were investigated for forming fibrous membranes of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co- hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). In both PV-electrospinning and NV-electrospinning, the fiber diameter generally increased with increasing needle inner diameter and PHBV concentration but decreased with increasing working distance. The use of a conductivity-enhancing surfactant, benzyl triethylammonium chloride (BTEAC), significantly reduced PHBV fiber diameters from the micron scale to the sub-micron scale. Interestingly, with increasing applied voltage, the fiber diameter increased for PV-electrospinning but decreased for NV-electrospinning. The PV-electrospun fibrous membranes from solutions without BTEAC (PVEfm) and with BTEAC (PVEfm-B) and NV-electrospun membranes from solutions without BTEAC (NVEfm) and with BTEAC (NVEfm-B) were characterized in terms of their structure, wettability, thermal properties and tensile properties. Both PVEfm and NVEfm exhibited similar water contact angles (∼104°) but the contact angle of PVEfm-B or NVEfm-B was not measurable. The elongation at break of PVEfm-B or NVEfm-B was significantly higher than that of PVEfm or NVEfm. Using NV-electrospinning or a combination of NV- and PV-electrospinning may be very useful for developing suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126265
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.936
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongHKU 7176/08E
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a GRF grant (HKU 7176/08E) from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong. The authors acknowledge the assistance provided by technical staff in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of The University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, HWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:18:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:18:57Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiomedical Materials, 2010, v. 5 n. 5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1748-6041en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126265-
dc.description.abstractElectrospinning of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds has been traditionally conducted using positive voltages. In the current study, positive voltage (PV) electrospinning and negative voltage (NV) electrospinning were investigated for forming fibrous membranes of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co- hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). In both PV-electrospinning and NV-electrospinning, the fiber diameter generally increased with increasing needle inner diameter and PHBV concentration but decreased with increasing working distance. The use of a conductivity-enhancing surfactant, benzyl triethylammonium chloride (BTEAC), significantly reduced PHBV fiber diameters from the micron scale to the sub-micron scale. Interestingly, with increasing applied voltage, the fiber diameter increased for PV-electrospinning but decreased for NV-electrospinning. The PV-electrospun fibrous membranes from solutions without BTEAC (PVEfm) and with BTEAC (PVEfm-B) and NV-electrospun membranes from solutions without BTEAC (NVEfm) and with BTEAC (NVEfm-B) were characterized in terms of their structure, wettability, thermal properties and tensile properties. Both PVEfm and NVEfm exhibited similar water contact angles (∼104°) but the contact angle of PVEfm-B or NVEfm-B was not measurable. The elongation at break of PVEfm-B or NVEfm-B was significantly higher than that of PVEfm or NVEfm. Using NV-electrospinning or a combination of NV- and PV-electrospinning may be very useful for developing suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/BMMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiomedical Materialsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsBiomedical Materials (Bristol). Copyright © Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshElectrochemistry-
dc.subject.meshPolyesters - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshPolymers - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshQuaternary Ammonium Compounds - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshTissue Scaffolds-
dc.titleElectrospinning of fibrous polymer scaffolds using positive voltage or negative voltage: A comparative studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1748-6041&volume=5&issue=5, article no. 054110&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Electrospinning+of+fibrous+polymer+scaffolds+using+positive+voltage+or+negative+voltage:+a+comparative+study-
dc.identifier.emailWang, M:memwang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00185en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1748-6041/5/5/054110en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20876963en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649265073en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183161en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649265073&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282277300011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, HW=23476100900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=15749714100en_HK

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