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Conference Paper: MEMRI study of mice cerebellar activation after voluntary wheel running
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TitleMEMRI study of mice cerebellar activation after voluntary wheel running
 
AuthorsZhou, IY
Chow, AMK
Chan, KCW
Lau, C
Wu, EX
 
Issue Date2010
 
CitationThe ISMRM-ESMRMB Joint Annual Meeting 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, 1-7 May 2010. [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractIn the present study, we use in vivo MEMRI to detect the cerebellar activation in mouse brain induced by voluntary wheel running. The preliminary result of our study shows that after voluntary wheel-running exercise, mouse cerebellum regions such as vermis, Crus I and II of ansiform lobule and caudal pontine reticular nucleus are significantly activated compared to the sedentary animals. This difference can be feasibly detected by MEMRI, suggesting the great potential of MEMRI as an in vivo probe for mapping neural activity.
 
DescriptionPosters - Applications of Manganese-Enhanced MRI/Animal Models of White Matter Disease: No. 4504
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhou, IY
 
dc.contributor.authorChow, AMK
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCW
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, C
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:10:43Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:10:43Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, we use in vivo MEMRI to detect the cerebellar activation in mouse brain induced by voluntary wheel running. The preliminary result of our study shows that after voluntary wheel-running exercise, mouse cerebellum regions such as vermis, Crus I and II of ansiform lobule and caudal pontine reticular nucleus are significantly activated compared to the sedentary animals. This difference can be feasibly detected by MEMRI, suggesting the great potential of MEMRI as an in vivo probe for mapping neural activity.
 
dc.descriptionPosters - Applications of Manganese-Enhanced MRI/Animal Models of White Matter Disease: No. 4504
 
dc.identifier.citationThe ISMRM-ESMRMB Joint Annual Meeting 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, 1-7 May 2010. [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.hkuros172313
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126117
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.relation.ispartofISMRM-ESMRMB Joint Annual Meeting
 
dc.titleMEMRI study of mice cerebellar activation after voluntary wheel running
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<item><contributor.author>Zhou, IY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chow, AMK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KCW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lau, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wu, EX</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-10-31T12:10:43Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-10-31T12:10:43Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2010</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The ISMRM-ESMRMB Joint Annual Meeting 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, 1-7 May 2010.</identifier.citation>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/126117</identifier.uri>
<description>Posters - Applications of Manganese-Enhanced MRI/Animal Models of White Matter Disease: No. 4504</description>
<description.abstract>In the present study, we use in vivo MEMRI to detect the cerebellar activation in mouse brain induced by voluntary wheel running. The preliminary result of our study shows that after voluntary wheel-running exercise, mouse cerebellum regions such as vermis, Crus I and II of ansiform lobule and caudal pontine reticular nucleus are significantly activated compared to the sedentary animals. This difference can be feasibly detected by MEMRI, suggesting the great potential of MEMRI as an in vivo probe for mapping neural activity.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<relation.ispartof>ISMRM-ESMRMB Joint Annual Meeting</relation.ispartof>
<title>MEMRI study of mice cerebellar activation after voluntary wheel running</title>
<type>Conference_Paper</type>
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