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Article: Match or mismatch: Use of the strengths model with chinese migrants experiencing mental illness: Service user and practitioner perspectives

TitleMatch or mismatch: Use of the strengths model with chinese migrants experiencing mental illness: Service user and practitioner perspectives
Authors
KeywordsCross-cultural approaches
Culturally responsive services
Recovery
Issue Date2010
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/15487768.asp
Citation
American Journal Of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 2010, v. 13 n. 3, p. 171-188 How to Cite?
AbstractThe strengths model assists service users and mental health practitioners to identify individual and environmental strengths and to secure resources to facilitate integration into the community and improve quality of life. Interventions are based on goals determined by the person with the mental illness and include support in accessing resources required to achieve goals. Aim: The study aimed to explore the use of the strengths model as a recovery intervention with Chinese people with mental illness in New Zealand. Method: This study was a qualitative study using individual interviews and focus groups to explore the views of Chinese service users, significant others, and health practitioners who have experience in using the strengths model. Analysis: Data were analyzed using a general inductive approach to identify key themes relevant to the research objectives. Results: The focus on personal and collective strengths and pragmatic approach adopted by the strengths model were regarded by participants as distinctive features of the model. On the whole, the service user participants regarded the strengths model as helpful in assisting their settlement and integration into the host society. Practitioners were confronted by the following three challenges in applying the model with Chinese migrants: passive role played by service users, difficulties in understanding the concept of strengths, and service users with complex needs. Conclusion: The Chinese migrant population is a growing community in most English-speaking countries. To provide culturally responsive strengths-based mental health services to Chinese migrants, it is critical for a number of factors to be taken into account, including language barriers and settlement issues, the Chinese cultural values of working with the family, and assessment and training tools that need to be translated from English to Chinese. It is important to measure the effectiveness of applying strengths-model interventions with Chinese users, particularly in comparison with conventional practice of case management. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125851
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.604
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDivis, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, YBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:55:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:55:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 2010, v. 13 n. 3, p. 171-188en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1548-7768en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125851-
dc.description.abstractThe strengths model assists service users and mental health practitioners to identify individual and environmental strengths and to secure resources to facilitate integration into the community and improve quality of life. Interventions are based on goals determined by the person with the mental illness and include support in accessing resources required to achieve goals. Aim: The study aimed to explore the use of the strengths model as a recovery intervention with Chinese people with mental illness in New Zealand. Method: This study was a qualitative study using individual interviews and focus groups to explore the views of Chinese service users, significant others, and health practitioners who have experience in using the strengths model. Analysis: Data were analyzed using a general inductive approach to identify key themes relevant to the research objectives. Results: The focus on personal and collective strengths and pragmatic approach adopted by the strengths model were regarded by participants as distinctive features of the model. On the whole, the service user participants regarded the strengths model as helpful in assisting their settlement and integration into the host society. Practitioners were confronted by the following three challenges in applying the model with Chinese migrants: passive role played by service users, difficulties in understanding the concept of strengths, and service users with complex needs. Conclusion: The Chinese migrant population is a growing community in most English-speaking countries. To provide culturally responsive strengths-based mental health services to Chinese migrants, it is critical for a number of factors to be taken into account, including language barriers and settlement issues, the Chinese cultural values of working with the family, and assessment and training tools that need to be translated from English to Chinese. It is important to measure the effectiveness of applying strengths-model interventions with Chinese users, particularly in comparison with conventional practice of case management. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/15487768.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitationen_HK
dc.rightsThis is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article-
dc.subjectCross-cultural approachesen_HK
dc.subjectCulturally responsive servicesen_HK
dc.subjectRecoveryen_HK
dc.titleMatch or mismatch: Use of the strengths model with chinese migrants experiencing mental illness: Service user and practitioner perspectivesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1548-7768&volume=13&issue=3&spage=171&epage=188&date=2010&atitle=Match+or+mismatch:+Use+of+the+strengths+model+with+chinese+migrants+experiencing+mental+illness:+Service+user+and+practitioner+perspectivesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, S: samsont@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, S=rp00627en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15487761003670145en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955643945en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183004en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955643945&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage171en_HK
dc.identifier.epage188en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, S=7006643163en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDivis, M=36466406600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, YB=36466704900en_HK

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