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Conference Paper: Using a self-assembling nanopeptide to achieve ocular hemostasis without causing clotting or secondary inflammation

TitleUsing a self-assembling nanopeptide to achieve ocular hemostasis without causing clotting or secondary inflammation
Authors
Keywords738 trauma
705 sclera
761 wound healing
Issue Date2010
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.
Citation
The 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), Fort Lauderdale, FL., 2-6 May 2010. In Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 2010, v. 51 n. 13, Abstract no. 427 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: : Hemostasis is a major problem in ocular surgical procedures. There are few effective methods to stop bleeding without causing secondary damage. Methods: : We made a laceration to the the sclera, cornea, or limbal vein in hamsters and rats and then applied a self-assembling nanopeptide (SAP) to the wound. For intraocular procedures we were able to directly inject the material at the site of injury. Results: : Complete hemostasis was achieved in less than 15 seconds when applied intraocularly, or directly to the surface of the sclera. The SAP stopped bleeding in less than 15 seconds and stabilized the local environment, without causing blockage of the vascular flow or an immune response. The novel therapy stops bleeding without the use of pressure, cauterization, vasoconstriction, coagulation, or cross-linked adhesives. The self-assembling solution is nontoxic and nonimmunogenic, and the breakdown products are amino acids, which are tissue building blocks that can be used to repair the site of injury. Conclusions: : This is the first use of nanotechnology to achieve ocular hemostasis in less than 15 seconds, both internally and externally, without causing secondary inflammation.
DescriptionPoster Session 116 - Nanodiagnostics, Nanomedicine, Nanoimaging, Artificial Vision, Stem Cell, Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: abstract no. 427/D1131
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125827
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEllis-Behnke, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTay, DKCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:54:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:54:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), Fort Lauderdale, FL., 2-6 May 2010. In Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 2010, v. 51 n. 13, Abstract no. 427en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1552-5783-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125827-
dc.descriptionPoster Session 116 - Nanodiagnostics, Nanomedicine, Nanoimaging, Artificial Vision, Stem Cell, Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: abstract no. 427/D1131-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: : Hemostasis is a major problem in ocular surgical procedures. There are few effective methods to stop bleeding without causing secondary damage. Methods: : We made a laceration to the the sclera, cornea, or limbal vein in hamsters and rats and then applied a self-assembling nanopeptide (SAP) to the wound. For intraocular procedures we were able to directly inject the material at the site of injury. Results: : Complete hemostasis was achieved in less than 15 seconds when applied intraocularly, or directly to the surface of the sclera. The SAP stopped bleeding in less than 15 seconds and stabilized the local environment, without causing blockage of the vascular flow or an immune response. The novel therapy stops bleeding without the use of pressure, cauterization, vasoconstriction, coagulation, or cross-linked adhesives. The self-assembling solution is nontoxic and nonimmunogenic, and the breakdown products are amino acids, which are tissue building blocks that can be used to repair the site of injury. Conclusions: : This is the first use of nanotechnology to achieve ocular hemostasis in less than 15 seconds, both internally and externally, without causing secondary inflammation.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.-
dc.relation.ispartofInvestigative Ophthalmology & Visual Scienceen_HK
dc.subject738 trauma-
dc.subject705 sclera-
dc.subject761 wound healing-
dc.titleUsing a self-assembling nanopeptide to achieve ocular hemostasis without causing clotting or secondary inflammationen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailEllis-Behnke, RG: rutledge@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiang, Y: yxliang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTay, DKC: dkctay@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEllis-Behnke, RG=rp00252en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, Y=rp00510en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTay, DKC=rp00336en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros180652en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherThe 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), Fort Lauderdale, FL., 2-6 May 2010.-

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