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Article: The feasibility of ambulatory screen time in children

TitleThe feasibility of ambulatory screen time in children
Authors
KeywordsEnergy expenditure
Physical activity
Play and playthings
Video games
Walking
Issue Date2009
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17477166.asp
Citation
International Journal Of Pediatric Obesity, 2009, v. 4 n. 2, p. 106-111 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose. A walking media station was developed, which enables normally seated screen activities to be conducted whilst walking. This study tests feasibility of the walking media station and provides preliminary evidence of the acceptability of the device in the home environment. Methods. Twenty-nine healthy children (mean age 9.6 years) participated in the testing of the newly developed walking media station in the laboratory and in the home environment. Results. Steady gait walking at1 km.hr-1 was achieved by all the children in less than 1 minute. There was no significant difference between computer game score during seated and walking play modes and no increase in energy cost when computer game play was added to walking (p > 0.05). When given the choice in the home, all chose to use the walking media station rather than play seated. When asked: "If this unit were yours to keep forever, would you play video games on it?" all responded affirmatively. Conclusion. These data demonstrate that when given a walking media station, children can and will use it. Re-engineering regular walking into otherwise seated gaming minimizes disruption to normal routines and provides an innovative and creative opportunity for further investigation into the sustainability and clinical outcomes of reducing sitting time and increasing physical activity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125665
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.025
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The University of Hong Kong Research Council Strategic Research Theme Public Health
Funding Information:

The authors would like to express their gratitude to The University of Hong Kong Research Council Strategic Research Theme Public Health for funding this project.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMellecker, RRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLanninghamFoster, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLevine, JAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:44:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:44:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pediatric Obesity, 2009, v. 4 n. 2, p. 106-111en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1747-7166en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125665-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. A walking media station was developed, which enables normally seated screen activities to be conducted whilst walking. This study tests feasibility of the walking media station and provides preliminary evidence of the acceptability of the device in the home environment. Methods. Twenty-nine healthy children (mean age 9.6 years) participated in the testing of the newly developed walking media station in the laboratory and in the home environment. Results. Steady gait walking at1 km.hr-1 was achieved by all the children in less than 1 minute. There was no significant difference between computer game score during seated and walking play modes and no increase in energy cost when computer game play was added to walking (p > 0.05). When given the choice in the home, all chose to use the walking media station rather than play seated. When asked: "If this unit were yours to keep forever, would you play video games on it?" all responded affirmatively. Conclusion. These data demonstrate that when given a walking media station, children can and will use it. Re-engineering regular walking into otherwise seated gaming minimizes disruption to normal routines and provides an innovative and creative opportunity for further investigation into the sustainability and clinical outcomes of reducing sitting time and increasing physical activity.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17477166.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Pediatric Obesityen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Pediatric Obesity. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.-
dc.subjectEnergy expenditureen_HK
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_HK
dc.subjectPlay and playthingsen_HK
dc.subjectVideo gamesen_HK
dc.subjectWalkingen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolism - physiology-
dc.subject.meshExercise - physiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshOverweight - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshPlay and Playthings-
dc.subject.meshWalking - physiology - psychology-
dc.titleThe feasibility of ambulatory screen time in childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1747-7166&volume=4&issue=2&spage=106&epage=111&date=2009&atitle=The+feasibility+of+ambulatory+screen+time+in+childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17477160802315002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18720174-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67649090313en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175204en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67649090313&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage106en_HK
dc.identifier.epage111en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1747-7174-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266085600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMellecker, RR=24765353100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcManus, AM=7004635919en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLanninghamFoster, LM=6506844675en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLevine, JA=7403580295en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7556558-

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