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Article: Expertise and the spatio-temporal characteristics of anticipatory information pick-up from complex movement patterns

TitleExpertise and the spatio-temporal characteristics of anticipatory information pick-up from complex movement patterns
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
Citation
Perception, 2010, v. 39 n. 6, p. 745-760 How to Cite?
AbstractGroups of high- (n = 14), intermediate- (n = 12), and low-skilled (n = 15) cricket batsmen participated in two experiments to examine expertise-related differences in anticipatory information pick-up that combined temporal and spatial occlusion methodologies. In experiment 1 participants were shown video displays of a bowler delivering one of three different types of delivery with the display manipulated so that only selected local features of the bowler's movement pattern (bowling hand, bowling hand and arm, trunk, lower body, or whole body) were visible and then only for specific time periods prior to ball release. Only the highly-skilled players were able to produce better-than-chance predictions of ball type and then only under a limited set of display conditions. Information from bowling hand and arm cues was particularly critical although continuous visibility of these cues was apparently not essential for information pick-up. In experiment 2 the order in which particular features were made visible throughout the bowler's movement pattern was varied in an attempt to find the sequence of cues that was most favourable for effective information pick-up. The necessity in this experiment to switch vision between different features eliminated the highly-skilled players' capability to anticipate. Expert anticipation is dependent on sensitivity to information arising from a select set of local cues, and forced attentional switches between different cues negate effective information pick-up and, with it, the expert advantage. © 2010 a Pion publication.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125650
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.518
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Cricket Australia
Queensland Academy of Sport
Funding Information:

The experiments reported in this paper were supported through research funding from Cricket Australia and the Queensland Academy of Sport. Video Vision of Information Technology Services at The University of Queensland supplied the professional video editing of temporal and spatial occlusion footage. Sincere thanks are expressed to the funding organisations, participants, video editing staff (particularly Derek Powell and Keith Cox), high performance state cricket coaches (particularly Trevor Bayliss, David Saker and Christ Harris) and John Reece (Discipline of Psychology, RMIT University) for their contributions to the research.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorEid, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcBean, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorRose, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:43:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:43:50Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPerception, 2010, v. 39 n. 6, p. 745-760en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125650-
dc.description.abstractGroups of high- (n = 14), intermediate- (n = 12), and low-skilled (n = 15) cricket batsmen participated in two experiments to examine expertise-related differences in anticipatory information pick-up that combined temporal and spatial occlusion methodologies. In experiment 1 participants were shown video displays of a bowler delivering one of three different types of delivery with the display manipulated so that only selected local features of the bowler's movement pattern (bowling hand, bowling hand and arm, trunk, lower body, or whole body) were visible and then only for specific time periods prior to ball release. Only the highly-skilled players were able to produce better-than-chance predictions of ball type and then only under a limited set of display conditions. Information from bowling hand and arm cues was particularly critical although continuous visibility of these cues was apparently not essential for information pick-up. In experiment 2 the order in which particular features were made visible throughout the bowler's movement pattern was varied in an attempt to find the sequence of cues that was most favourable for effective information pick-up. The necessity in this experiment to switch vision between different features eliminated the highly-skilled players' capability to anticipate. Expert anticipation is dependent on sensitivity to information arising from a select set of local cues, and forced attentional switches between different cues negate effective information pick-up and, with it, the expert advantage. © 2010 a Pion publication.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPerceptionen_HK
dc.titleExpertise and the spatio-temporal characteristics of anticipatory information pick-up from complex movement patternsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, B: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, B=rp00886en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/p6438en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20698470-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954774662en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182609en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954774662&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage745en_HK
dc.identifier.epage760en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280218000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMüller, S=15060486600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbernethy, B=8841578500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEid, M=35210250600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcBean, R=35211453600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRose, M=35211296200en_HK

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