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Article: Review: The understanding of spirituality and the potential role of spiritual care in end-of-life and palliative care: A meta-study of qualitative research

TitleReview: The understanding of spirituality and the potential role of spiritual care in end-of-life and palliative care: A meta-study of qualitative research
Authors
Keywordsend of life
palliative
qualitative
spiritual care
spirituality
systematic review
Issue Date2010
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://pmj.sagepub.com
Citation
Palliative Medicine, 2010, v. 24 n. 8, p. 753-770 How to Cite?
AbstractSpirituality and spiritual care are gaining increasing attention but their potential contribution to palliative care remains unclear. The aim of this study was to synthesize qualitative literature on spirituality and spiritual care at the end of life using a systematic ('meta-study') review. Eleven patient articles and eight with healthcare providers were included, incorporating data from 178 patients and 116 healthcare providers, mainly from elderly White and Judaeo-Christian origin patients with cancer. Spirituality principally focused on relationships, rather than just meaning making, and was given as a relationship. Spirituality was a broader term that may or may not encompass religion. A 'spirit to spirit' framework for spiritual care-giving respects individual personhood. This was achieved in the way physical care was given, by focusing on presence, journeying together, listening, connecting, creating openings, and engaging in reciprocal sharing. Affirmative relationships supported patients, enabling them to respond to their spiritual needs. The engagement of family caregivers in spiritual care appears underutilized. Relationships formed an integral part of spirituality as they were a spiritual need, caused spiritual distress when broken and were the way spiritual care was given. Barriers to spiritual care include lack of time, personal, cultural or institutional factors, and professional educational needs. By addressing these, we may make an important contribution to the improvement of patient care towards the end of life. © 2010 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125628
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.685
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.914
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPang, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShiu, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:42:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:42:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPalliative Medicine, 2010, v. 24 n. 8, p. 753-770en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-2163en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125628-
dc.description.abstractSpirituality and spiritual care are gaining increasing attention but their potential contribution to palliative care remains unclear. The aim of this study was to synthesize qualitative literature on spirituality and spiritual care at the end of life using a systematic ('meta-study') review. Eleven patient articles and eight with healthcare providers were included, incorporating data from 178 patients and 116 healthcare providers, mainly from elderly White and Judaeo-Christian origin patients with cancer. Spirituality principally focused on relationships, rather than just meaning making, and was given as a relationship. Spirituality was a broader term that may or may not encompass religion. A 'spirit to spirit' framework for spiritual care-giving respects individual personhood. This was achieved in the way physical care was given, by focusing on presence, journeying together, listening, connecting, creating openings, and engaging in reciprocal sharing. Affirmative relationships supported patients, enabling them to respond to their spiritual needs. The engagement of family caregivers in spiritual care appears underutilized. Relationships formed an integral part of spirituality as they were a spiritual need, caused spiritual distress when broken and were the way spiritual care was given. Barriers to spiritual care include lack of time, personal, cultural or institutional factors, and professional educational needs. By addressing these, we may make an important contribution to the improvement of patient care towards the end of life. © 2010 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://pmj.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPalliative Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsPalliative Medicine. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectend of lifeen_HK
dc.subjectpalliativeen_HK
dc.subjectqualitativeen_HK
dc.subjectspiritual careen_HK
dc.subjectspiritualityen_HK
dc.subjectsystematic reviewen_HK
dc.titleReview: The understanding of spirituality and the potential role of spiritual care in end-of-life and palliative care: A meta-study of qualitative researchen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0269-2163&volume=24&issue=8&spage=753&epage=770&date=2010&atitle=The+understanding+of+spirituality+and+the+potential+role+of+spiritual+care+in+end-of-life+and+palliative+care:+a+meta-study+of+qualitative+researchen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, C: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, C=rp00579en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0269216310375860en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20659977-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78650298734en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174872en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78650298734&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage753en_HK
dc.identifier.epage770en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285049900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdwards, A=24579332800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, N=36739434600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShiu, V=36740059900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, C=35274549700en_HK

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