File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Leg length and age of puberty among men and women from a developing population: The guangzhou biobank cohort study

TitleLeg length and age of puberty among men and women from a developing population: The guangzhou biobank cohort study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/
Citation
American Journal Of Human Biology, 2010, v. 22 n. 5, p. 683-687 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Leg length and relative leg length are considered to be reliable markers of prepubertal living conditions. Cessation of leg growth, driven by estrogen, occurs earlier in puberty in girls than boys.We hypothesized that leg length and relative leg length, as sitting height to leg ratio, might have sex-specific associations with age of puberty. Methods: We used multivariable linear regression in 10,046 older (≥50 years) Chinese from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (Phase 3) to examine the associations of recalled age of puberty (women: age of menarche, and men: mean age of first nocturnal emission, voice breaking, and first pubic hair) with subischeal leg length, sitting height to leg ratio, and sitting height. Results: Leg length and sitting height to leg ratio had different associations with age of puberty in men and women (P-values for interaction <0.001), but sitting height did not. Per year earlier puberty, legs were longer among men by 0.09 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-0.18) and shorter among women by 20.16 cm (95% CI 20.20 to 20.12). Further adjustment for age, hip size (as a marker of buttock fat), and several markers of childhood conditions did not obviate the difference in association by sex. Conclusions: Adult leg length and relative leg length (sitting height to leg ratio) may be biomarkers of different exposures in men and women, with corresponding implications for their interpretation as a biomarker of early life exposures. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125619
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.875
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.018
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health (Hong Kong)
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China)
University of Birmingham (UK)
Clinical Trial Service Unit, The University of Oxford
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsors The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, The University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health (Hong Kong), Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China), The University of Birmingham (UK)

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:41:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Human Biology, 2010, v. 22 n. 5, p. 683-687en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1042-0533en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125619-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Leg length and relative leg length are considered to be reliable markers of prepubertal living conditions. Cessation of leg growth, driven by estrogen, occurs earlier in puberty in girls than boys.We hypothesized that leg length and relative leg length, as sitting height to leg ratio, might have sex-specific associations with age of puberty. Methods: We used multivariable linear regression in 10,046 older (≥50 years) Chinese from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (Phase 3) to examine the associations of recalled age of puberty (women: age of menarche, and men: mean age of first nocturnal emission, voice breaking, and first pubic hair) with subischeal leg length, sitting height to leg ratio, and sitting height. Results: Leg length and sitting height to leg ratio had different associations with age of puberty in men and women (P-values for interaction <0.001), but sitting height did not. Per year earlier puberty, legs were longer among men by 0.09 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-0.18) and shorter among women by 20.16 cm (95% CI 20.20 to 20.12). Further adjustment for age, hip size (as a marker of buttock fat), and several markers of childhood conditions did not obviate the difference in association by sex. Conclusions: Adult leg length and relative leg length (sitting height to leg ratio) may be biomarkers of different exposures in men and women, with corresponding implications for their interpretation as a biomarker of early life exposures. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Human Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Human Biology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshLeg - anatomy and histology - growth and development-
dc.subject.meshPuberty - physiology-
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristics-
dc.titleLeg length and age of puberty among men and women from a developing population: The guangzhou biobank cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1042-0533&volume=22&issue=5&spage=683&epage=687&date=2010&atitle=Leg+length+and+age+of+puberty+among+men+and+women+from+a+developing+population:+The+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajhb.21067en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20737617-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957284428en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183026en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957284428&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage683en_HK
dc.identifier.epage687en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281492900016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=24464616400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=34467446100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats