File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Paternal smoking and childhood overweight: Evidence from the Hong Kong "children of 1997"

TitlePaternal smoking and childhood overweight: Evidence from the Hong Kong "children of 1997"
Authors
KeywordsBody mass index
Children
Cohort study
Overweight
Paternal smoking
Secondhand smoke
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
Citation
Pediatrics, 2010, v. 126 n. 1, p. e46-e56 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: This study examined, in a non-Western sociohistorical context, whether prenatal or postnatal secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure for children of nonsmoking mothers was associated with higher childhood BMI, and it clarified whether the observed associations were biologically mediated or socioeconomically confounded. METHODS: A total of 6710 and 6519 children of nonsmoking mothers (N = 7924) with BMI data at ∼7 and ∼11 years, respectively, from a population-representative (N = 8327), Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort ("Children of 1997"), born in April or May 1997, were included in the analysis. RESULTS: Compared with no SHS exposure, daily paternal smoking increased mean BMI z scores, but not height, at 7 years (difference: 0.10 [95% confidence interval: 0.02-0.19]) and at 11 years (difference: 0.16 [95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.26]), with adjustment for gender, birth order, socioeconomic position, mother's place of birth, breastfeeding, serious morbidity, and pubertal status. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, although preliminary, suggest that the association of paternal smoking with child overweight might be biologically mediated. Given the known harms of smoking, reducing SHS exposure from conception as a precautionary action for childhood overweight might be warranted. Copyright © 2010 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125618
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.226
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health Care and Promotion Fund Committee in Hong Kong216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund in Hong Kong03040711
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong04050172
Funding Information:

The initial study was supported by the Hong Kong Health Care and Promotion Fund Committee in Hong Kong (grant 216106). Retrieval of identifiers and subsequent data abstractions through record linkage in 2005-2006 were funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund in Hong Kong (grant 03040711). Retrieval of more-detailed information on family SEP was funded by the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong (grant 04050172).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:41:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:41:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics, 2010, v. 126 n. 1, p. e46-e56en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125618-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: This study examined, in a non-Western sociohistorical context, whether prenatal or postnatal secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure for children of nonsmoking mothers was associated with higher childhood BMI, and it clarified whether the observed associations were biologically mediated or socioeconomically confounded. METHODS: A total of 6710 and 6519 children of nonsmoking mothers (N = 7924) with BMI data at ∼7 and ∼11 years, respectively, from a population-representative (N = 8327), Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort ("Children of 1997"), born in April or May 1997, were included in the analysis. RESULTS: Compared with no SHS exposure, daily paternal smoking increased mean BMI z scores, but not height, at 7 years (difference: 0.10 [95% confidence interval: 0.02-0.19]) and at 11 years (difference: 0.16 [95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.26]), with adjustment for gender, birth order, socioeconomic position, mother's place of birth, breastfeeding, serious morbidity, and pubertal status. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, although preliminary, suggest that the association of paternal smoking with child overweight might be biologically mediated. Given the known harms of smoking, reducing SHS exposure from conception as a precautionary action for childhood overweight might be warranted. Copyright © 2010 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectBody mass indexen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectCohort studyen_HK
dc.subjectOverweighten_HK
dc.subjectPaternal smokingen_HK
dc.subjectSecondhand smokeen_HK
dc.subject.meshSecondhand smoke-
dc.subject.meshPaternal smoking-
dc.subject.meshChildren-
dc.subject.meshBody mass index-
dc.subject.meshCohort study-
dc.titlePaternal smoking and childhood overweight: Evidence from the Hong Kong "children of 1997"en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-4005&volume=126&issue=1&spage=e46&epage=56&date=2010&atitle=Paternal+smoking+and+childhood+overweight:+evidence+from+the+Hong+Kong+%27Children+of+1997%27en_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2009-2642en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20587672-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954360463en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174154en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954360463&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume126en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee46en_HK
dc.identifier.epagee56en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279431000030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectInfectious illness and secondhand smoke exposure in utero and during the first 8 years of life-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, MK=12806220300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats