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Article: Dietary intake of phytoestrogen is associated with increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with cardiovascular disease
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TitleDietary intake of phytoestrogen is associated with increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with cardiovascular disease
 
AuthorsChan, YH2
Lam, TH2
Lau, KK2
Yiu, KH2
Siu, CW2 1
Li, SW4
Chan, HT2
Tam, S3
Lau, CP2
Tse, HF2 1
 
KeywordsEndothelial progenitor cells
Isoflavone
Phytoestrogen
Vascular function
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://cpr.sagepub.com/
 
CitationEuropean Journal Of Cardiovascular Prevention And Rehabilitation, 2011, v. 18 n. 3, p. 360-368 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1741826710389385
 
AbstractEndogenous estrogen is known to positively influence the level and functionality of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). However, the effect of phytoestrogen on EPC is unknown. Isoflavone is a major component of phytoestrogen. This study aims to investigate if the intake of isoflavone has any impact on the circulating level of EPC. We studied 102 consecutive patients (mean age: 66.5±9.5 years, 78% male, all female post-menopausal) with cardiovascular disease (atherothrombotic stroke 62%, coronary artery disease 38%). Circulating levels of CD133 + EPC were determined by flow cytometry. Non-invasive pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured. Long-term intake of isoflavone was determined by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Isoflavone intake was positively associated with circulating CD133 + EPC (r=0.31, p=0.001). Patients with circulating CD133 + EPC <10th percentile had significantly lower isoflavone intake than patients with CD133 +EPC≥10th percentile (4.6±3.7 mg/day versus 19.3±30.2 mg/day, p<0.001). A significant overall linear trend of circulating EPC across increasing tertiles of isoflavone intake was observed (p=0.004). Adjusted for potential confounders, increased isoflavone intake from the 1st to the 3rd tertile independently predicted increased circulating CD133 + EPC level by 221 cells/μl (95%CI: 71.4 to 369.8, relative increase 160%, p=0.004). Gender was not a significant factor (p>0.05). Furthermore, circulating CD133 + EPC <10th percentile was independently predictive of increased PWV by 261.7 cm/s (95% CI: 37.1 to 486.2, p=0.024). The study demonstrated that circulating EPC increased by more than one fold in patients with cardiovascular disease who had higher intake of isoflavone, suggesting that isoflavone may confer vascular protection through enhanced endothelial repair. © The European Society of Cardiology 2011.
 
ISSN1741-8267
2013 Impact Factor: 3.691
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1741826710389385
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291026100002
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong2008-07176179
2009-07176063
Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the CRCG Small Project Funding of University of Hong Kong (grant number 2008-07176179 and 2009-07176063) and Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, YH
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, KK
 
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorSiu, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, HT
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, CP
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, HF
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:41:31Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:41:31Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractEndogenous estrogen is known to positively influence the level and functionality of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). However, the effect of phytoestrogen on EPC is unknown. Isoflavone is a major component of phytoestrogen. This study aims to investigate if the intake of isoflavone has any impact on the circulating level of EPC. We studied 102 consecutive patients (mean age: 66.5±9.5 years, 78% male, all female post-menopausal) with cardiovascular disease (atherothrombotic stroke 62%, coronary artery disease 38%). Circulating levels of CD133 + EPC were determined by flow cytometry. Non-invasive pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured. Long-term intake of isoflavone was determined by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Isoflavone intake was positively associated with circulating CD133 + EPC (r=0.31, p=0.001). Patients with circulating CD133 + EPC <10th percentile had significantly lower isoflavone intake than patients with CD133 +EPC≥10th percentile (4.6±3.7 mg/day versus 19.3±30.2 mg/day, p<0.001). A significant overall linear trend of circulating EPC across increasing tertiles of isoflavone intake was observed (p=0.004). Adjusted for potential confounders, increased isoflavone intake from the 1st to the 3rd tertile independently predicted increased circulating CD133 + EPC level by 221 cells/μl (95%CI: 71.4 to 369.8, relative increase 160%, p=0.004). Gender was not a significant factor (p>0.05). Furthermore, circulating CD133 + EPC <10th percentile was independently predictive of increased PWV by 261.7 cm/s (95% CI: 37.1 to 486.2, p=0.024). The study demonstrated that circulating EPC increased by more than one fold in patients with cardiovascular disease who had higher intake of isoflavone, suggesting that isoflavone may confer vascular protection through enhanced endothelial repair. © The European Society of Cardiology 2011.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Cardiovascular Prevention And Rehabilitation, 2011, v. 18 n. 3, p. 360-368 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1741826710389385
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1741826710389385
 
dc.identifier.eissn2047-4881
 
dc.identifier.epage368
 
dc.identifier.hkuros179881
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198032
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291026100002
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong2008-07176179
2009-07176063
Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the CRCG Small Project Funding of University of Hong Kong (grant number 2008-07176179 and 2009-07176063) and Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation.

 
dc.identifier.issn1741-8267
2013 Impact Factor: 3.691
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21450646
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959245865
 
dc.identifier.spage360
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125613
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://cpr.sagepub.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - blood - diet therapy - prevention & control
 
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplements
 
dc.subject.meshEndothelial Cells - cytology - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular - cytology - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFlow Cytometry
 
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshPhytoestrogens - administration & dosage
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshStem Cells - physiology
 
dc.subjectEndothelial progenitor cells
 
dc.subjectIsoflavone
 
dc.subjectPhytoestrogen
 
dc.subjectVascular function
 
dc.titleDietary intake of phytoestrogen is associated with increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with cardiovascular disease
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lau, KK</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Siu, CW</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Endogenous estrogen is known to positively influence the level and functionality of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). However, the effect of phytoestrogen on EPC is unknown. Isoflavone is a major component of phytoestrogen. This study aims to investigate if the intake of isoflavone has any impact on the circulating level of EPC. We studied 102 consecutive patients (mean age: 66.5&#177;9.5 years, 78% male, all female post-menopausal) with cardiovascular disease (atherothrombotic stroke 62%, coronary artery disease 38%). Circulating levels of CD133 + EPC were determined by flow cytometry. Non-invasive pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured. Long-term intake of isoflavone was determined by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Isoflavone intake was positively associated with circulating CD133 + EPC (r=0.31, p=0.001). Patients with circulating CD133 + EPC &lt;10th percentile had significantly lower isoflavone intake than patients with CD133 +EPC&#8805;10th percentile (4.6&#177;3.7 mg/day versus 19.3&#177;30.2 mg/day, p&lt;0.001). A significant overall linear trend of circulating EPC across increasing tertiles of isoflavone intake was observed (p=0.004). Adjusted for potential confounders, increased isoflavone intake from the 1st to the 3rd tertile independently predicted increased circulating CD133 + EPC level by 221 cells/&#956;l (95%CI: 71.4 to 369.8, relative increase 160%, p=0.004). Gender was not a significant factor (p&gt;0.05). Furthermore, circulating CD133 + EPC &lt;10th percentile was independently predictive of increased PWV by 261.7 cm/s (95% CI: 37.1 to 486.2, p=0.024). The study demonstrated that circulating EPC increased by more than one fold in patients with cardiovascular disease who had higher intake of isoflavone, suggesting that isoflavone may confer vascular protection through enhanced endothelial repair. &#169; The European Society of Cardiology 2011.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  4. Tung Wah Hospital