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Article: Preliminary Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (ChCPCI) in a Hong Kong Chinese Population

TitlePreliminary Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (ChCPCI) in a Hong Kong Chinese Population
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Chronic pain
confirmatory factor analysis
coping strategies
Issue Date2010
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpain
Citation
Journal Of Pain, 2010, v. 11 n. 7, p. 672-680 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI) is a frequently used measure that assesses 8 categories of coping strategies that patients might use to cope with chronic pain. Despite its good psychometric properties and widespread use, the instrument has not been tested for its applicability and validity in non-Western populations, such as among Chinese. This study evaluated the reliability and validity of a Chinese translation of the 42-item CPCI (ChCPCI-42) in a sample of Chinese patients with chronic pain (n = 208). In addition to the ChCPCI-42, the patients were administered the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) questionnaire, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Centre for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and questions assessing sociodemographic characteristics. Results of confirmatory factor analyses revealed that of the ChCPCI-42 8 scales, 6 demonstrated acceptable-to-good data-model fit (CFI ≥ 0.90) and 2 demonstrated medium fit (CFI ≥ 0.85). The 8 scales demonstrated adequate to good internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.69 to 0.79) and correlated with CES-D, PCS, pain intensity, and disability in expected directions. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that the ChCPCI-42 scales predicted concurrent depression (F (8,177) = 3.07, P < .01) and pain disability (F (1, 179) = 4.35, P < .001) scores, the Task Persistence scale being the strongest unique predictor among the 8 scales. The findings support the factorial validity and reliability of a 42-item CPCI that can be used among Chinese patients with chronic pain. Perspective: The report outlines the first validation of the CPCI for use in Hong Kong Chinese. This makes available a suitable instrument for chronic pain research in the Southern Chinese population and will help to elucidate similarities and differences in pain coping between Chinese and other ethnic groups. © 2010 American Pain Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125611
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.124
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health and Health Services04060591
CityU New Staff Start-up Grant7200117
Funding Information:

Supported by the Health and Health Services Research Fund (Project No. 04060591) and a CityU New Staff Start-up Grant (Project No. 7200117).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJensen, MPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, BKHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:41:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:41:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pain, 2010, v. 11 n. 7, p. 672-680en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1526-5900en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125611-
dc.description.abstractThe Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI) is a frequently used measure that assesses 8 categories of coping strategies that patients might use to cope with chronic pain. Despite its good psychometric properties and widespread use, the instrument has not been tested for its applicability and validity in non-Western populations, such as among Chinese. This study evaluated the reliability and validity of a Chinese translation of the 42-item CPCI (ChCPCI-42) in a sample of Chinese patients with chronic pain (n = 208). In addition to the ChCPCI-42, the patients were administered the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) questionnaire, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Centre for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and questions assessing sociodemographic characteristics. Results of confirmatory factor analyses revealed that of the ChCPCI-42 8 scales, 6 demonstrated acceptable-to-good data-model fit (CFI ≥ 0.90) and 2 demonstrated medium fit (CFI ≥ 0.85). The 8 scales demonstrated adequate to good internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.69 to 0.79) and correlated with CES-D, PCS, pain intensity, and disability in expected directions. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that the ChCPCI-42 scales predicted concurrent depression (F (8,177) = 3.07, P < .01) and pain disability (F (1, 179) = 4.35, P < .001) scores, the Task Persistence scale being the strongest unique predictor among the 8 scales. The findings support the factorial validity and reliability of a 42-item CPCI that can be used among Chinese patients with chronic pain. Perspective: The report outlines the first validation of the CPCI for use in Hong Kong Chinese. This makes available a suitable instrument for chronic pain research in the Southern Chinese population and will help to elucidate similarities and differences in pain coping between Chinese and other ethnic groups. © 2010 American Pain Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpainen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Painen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in The Journal of Pain. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in The Journal of Pain, 2010, v. 11 n. 7, p. 672-680. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpain.2009.10.008-
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectChronic painen_HK
dc.subjectconfirmatory factor analysisen_HK
dc.subjectcoping strategiesen_HK
dc.titlePreliminary Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (ChCPCI) in a Hong Kong Chinese Populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1526-5900&volume=11&issue=7&spage=672&epage=680&date=2010&atitle=Preliminary+psychometric+properties+of+the+Chinese+version+of+the+Chronic+Pain+Coping+Inventory+(ChCPCI)+in+a+Hong+Kong+Chinese+population-
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpain.2009.10.008en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20015705-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953870708en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174165en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953870708&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage672en_HK
dc.identifier.epage680en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279969500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectThe prevalence of chronic pain, fatigue, and insomnia in the general population of Hong Kong-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WS=7403972073en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJensen, MP=7401786989en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KH=12768176000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, BKH=36174749700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike11828189-

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