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Article: Leisure participation pattern of residents in a New Chinese City

TitleLeisure participation pattern of residents in a New Chinese City
Authors
KeywordsExtrahome leisure
Holiday effect
Intrahome leisure
Leisure barrier
Urban green space
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ANNA
Citation
Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers, 2009, v. 99 n. 4, p. 657-673 How to Cite?
AbstractThe leisure sector in Chinese cities has flourished in recent years. Lacking leisure studies could compromise resource supply and management. We explored urban residents' participation in twenty-five leisure activities in Zhuhai, a newly developed city in south China. Leisure activities were classified into four groups based on consumption venue (intrahome and extrahome) and physical activities (passive and active). A face-to-face questionnaire survey included 850 households in seventy residential precincts chosen by a clustered sampling scheme, generating 598 valid questionnaires. Responses were solicited on participation level on weekdays and holidays, leisure time, leisure companions, leisure barriers, use of urban green spaces, and respondents' socioeco-nomic profile. Multiple and logistic regressions were computed. Intrahome activities have higher participation rates than extrahome activities, and passive notably higher than active. The weekday leisure pattern is similar to holiday patterns despite more leisure time. Watching television, chatting with families or friends, and leisure reading are premier intrahome activities. Walking for leisure and shopping are the main extrahome engagements. Intrahome activities are more prominent among urban-based, homebound, passive-oriented, sedentary, and indi-vidualistic noninteractive types, with health implications. Middle-aged residents have less leisure time vis-à-vis young adults. Shortage of leisure resources and poor recreation venue management have created critical partici-pation barriers. Residents prefer conveniently located and semiprivate neighborhood gardens embedded within residential developments rather than public sites. Young residents prefer to use urban parks, whereas middle-age and older residents prefer local sites. Cleanliness and other quality attributes are rated as key determinants for visiting green spaces. The results could inform future policies on leisure development in new Chinese cities. © 2009 by Association of American Geographers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125592
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.756
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.896
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, WYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:40:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:40:17Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of The Association Of American Geographers, 2009, v. 99 n. 4, p. 657-673en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0004-5608en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125592-
dc.description.abstractThe leisure sector in Chinese cities has flourished in recent years. Lacking leisure studies could compromise resource supply and management. We explored urban residents' participation in twenty-five leisure activities in Zhuhai, a newly developed city in south China. Leisure activities were classified into four groups based on consumption venue (intrahome and extrahome) and physical activities (passive and active). A face-to-face questionnaire survey included 850 households in seventy residential precincts chosen by a clustered sampling scheme, generating 598 valid questionnaires. Responses were solicited on participation level on weekdays and holidays, leisure time, leisure companions, leisure barriers, use of urban green spaces, and respondents' socioeco-nomic profile. Multiple and logistic regressions were computed. Intrahome activities have higher participation rates than extrahome activities, and passive notably higher than active. The weekday leisure pattern is similar to holiday patterns despite more leisure time. Watching television, chatting with families or friends, and leisure reading are premier intrahome activities. Walking for leisure and shopping are the main extrahome engagements. Intrahome activities are more prominent among urban-based, homebound, passive-oriented, sedentary, and indi-vidualistic noninteractive types, with health implications. Middle-aged residents have less leisure time vis-à-vis young adults. Shortage of leisure resources and poor recreation venue management have created critical partici-pation barriers. Residents prefer conveniently located and semiprivate neighborhood gardens embedded within residential developments rather than public sites. Young residents prefer to use urban parks, whereas middle-age and older residents prefer local sites. Cleanliness and other quality attributes are rated as key determinants for visiting green spaces. The results could inform future policies on leisure development in new Chinese cities. © 2009 by Association of American Geographers.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ANNAen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the Association of American Geographersen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectExtrahome leisureen_HK
dc.subjectHoliday effecten_HK
dc.subjectIntrahome leisureen_HK
dc.subjectLeisure barrieren_HK
dc.subjectUrban green spaceen_HK
dc.titleLeisure participation pattern of residents in a New Chinese Cityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0004-5608&volume=99&issue=4&spage=657&epage=673&date=2009&atitle=Leisure+participation+pattern+of+residents+in+a+New+Chinese+Cityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00045600903066482en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69949128227en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180497en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69949128227&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume99en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage657en_HK
dc.identifier.epage673en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269580800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, WY=7409636917en_HK

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