File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: New frontiers of assisted reproductive technology (Chien Tien Hsu Memorial Lecture 2007)

TitleNew frontiers of assisted reproductive technology (Chien Tien Hsu Memorial Lecture 2007)
Authors
KeywordsAssisted reproduction
In vitro fertilization
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia.
Citation
Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynaecology Research, 2009, v. 35 n. 1, p. 1-8 How to Cite?
AbstractMany significant advances have been made in assisted reproductive technology since the birth of the first baby conceived with in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. The development of recombinant gonadotropins and gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists helps to simplify the ovarian stimulation. Excessive ovarian stimulation should be avoided because of the risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and reduction in endometrial receptivity. Maturation of oocytes in vitro has been developed in some centers. It is still uncertain whether techniques such as assisted hatching, blastocyst transfer and pre-implantation aneuploidy screening can improve the live birth rates in assisted reproduction. The introduction of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for selection of human lymphocyte antigens (HLA) compatible embryos for treatment of siblings has raised ethical concerns. There is a higher risk of obstetric complications and congenital abnormalities even in singleton pregnancies achieved with assisted reproduction. Because of the risks of multiple pregnancies, elective single embryo transfer is increasingly used in good-prognosis patients. With a good freezing program, the cumulative pregnancy rate (including the pregnancies from subsequent replacement of frozen-thawed embryos) is not adversely affected. Improvement in cryopreservation techniques has made it possible to cryopreserve slices of ovarian tissue or oocytes, thus helping women who have to receive sterilizing forms of anti-cancer treatment to preserve their fertility. It is important that the development of the new techniques should be based on good scientific evidence. Ethical, legal and social implications should also be considered before the introduction of new techniques. © 2009 The Author.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125549
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.091
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.521
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, PCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:37:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:37:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Obstetrics And Gynaecology Research, 2009, v. 35 n. 1, p. 1-8en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1341-8076en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125549-
dc.description.abstractMany significant advances have been made in assisted reproductive technology since the birth of the first baby conceived with in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. The development of recombinant gonadotropins and gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists helps to simplify the ovarian stimulation. Excessive ovarian stimulation should be avoided because of the risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and reduction in endometrial receptivity. Maturation of oocytes in vitro has been developed in some centers. It is still uncertain whether techniques such as assisted hatching, blastocyst transfer and pre-implantation aneuploidy screening can improve the live birth rates in assisted reproduction. The introduction of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for selection of human lymphocyte antigens (HLA) compatible embryos for treatment of siblings has raised ethical concerns. There is a higher risk of obstetric complications and congenital abnormalities even in singleton pregnancies achieved with assisted reproduction. Because of the risks of multiple pregnancies, elective single embryo transfer is increasingly used in good-prognosis patients. With a good freezing program, the cumulative pregnancy rate (including the pregnancies from subsequent replacement of frozen-thawed embryos) is not adversely affected. Improvement in cryopreservation techniques has made it possible to cryopreserve slices of ovarian tissue or oocytes, thus helping women who have to receive sterilizing forms of anti-cancer treatment to preserve their fertility. It is important that the development of the new techniques should be based on good scientific evidence. Ethical, legal and social implications should also be considered before the introduction of new techniques. © 2009 The Author.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Researchen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectAssisted reproductionen_HK
dc.subjectIn vitro fertilizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshReproductive Techniques, Assisted-
dc.titleNew frontiers of assisted reproductive technology (Chien Tien Hsu Memorial Lecture 2007)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1341-8076&volume=35&issue=1&spage=1&epage=8&date=2009&atitle=New+frontiers+of+assisted+reproductive+technology+(Chien+Tien+Hsu+Memorial+Lecture+2007)en_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PC:pcho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PC=rp00325en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1447-0756.2008.00957.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19215541-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58949096146en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros181344en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58949096146&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage8en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262673300001-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PC=7402211440en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3959318-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats