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Article: The thinking styles of human resource practitioners

TitleThe thinking styles of human resource practitioners
Authors
KeywordsHuman resource management
Thinking styles
Issue Date2009
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/tlo.htm
Citation
Learning Organization, 2009, v. 16 n. 4, p. 276-289 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Drawing upon Sternberg's theory of mental self-government, this paper aims to investigate the thinking styles and workplace experiences of 152 human resource (HR) practitioners pursuing Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) membership. It seeks to explore whether their thinking styles complemented their jobs and consider the implications for the CIPD's notion of the "thinking performer". Design/methodology/approach: A two-part questionnaire, including the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (Sternberg et al.) is completed by the research participants to identify their Type I (creativity-generating) and Type II (norm-favouring) thinking styles. Six focus group sessions are also conducted to gather insights about the participants' workplace experiences. Findings: On average, participants scored more highly on Type I thinking styles. Although this suggested their thinking styles are consistent with the "thinking performer" ideal, focus group participants doubted whether the creativity-generating attributes of Type I suited the reality of the HR function, which is described as being awash with rule bound behaviours. Particularly, this is the experience of junior staff, who felt unable to challenge senior management or contribute to the bigger picture. Correlation coefficients revealed that age, length of service with current organization and perceived autonomy at work are the most significant socialisation variables. Practical implications: Emphasis on strategic matters in CIPD courses needs to be balanced with a greater recognition of the operational and routine reality of much HR practice. Originality/value: This represents the first known attempt to test thinking performer construct amongst HR practitioners. The study combines questionnaire and focus group methods. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125525
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.561
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:36:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:36:19Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLearning Organization, 2009, v. 16 n. 4, p. 276-289en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0969-6474en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125525-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Drawing upon Sternberg's theory of mental self-government, this paper aims to investigate the thinking styles and workplace experiences of 152 human resource (HR) practitioners pursuing Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) membership. It seeks to explore whether their thinking styles complemented their jobs and consider the implications for the CIPD's notion of the "thinking performer". Design/methodology/approach: A two-part questionnaire, including the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (Sternberg et al.) is completed by the research participants to identify their Type I (creativity-generating) and Type II (norm-favouring) thinking styles. Six focus group sessions are also conducted to gather insights about the participants' workplace experiences. Findings: On average, participants scored more highly on Type I thinking styles. Although this suggested their thinking styles are consistent with the "thinking performer" ideal, focus group participants doubted whether the creativity-generating attributes of Type I suited the reality of the HR function, which is described as being awash with rule bound behaviours. Particularly, this is the experience of junior staff, who felt unable to challenge senior management or contribute to the bigger picture. Correlation coefficients revealed that age, length of service with current organization and perceived autonomy at work are the most significant socialisation variables. Practical implications: Emphasis on strategic matters in CIPD courses needs to be balanced with a greater recognition of the operational and routine reality of much HR practice. Originality/value: This represents the first known attempt to test thinking performer construct amongst HR practitioners. The study combines questionnaire and focus group methods. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/tlo.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLearning Organizationen_HK
dc.subjectHuman resource managementen_HK
dc.subjectThinking stylesen_HK
dc.titleThe thinking styles of human resource practitionersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0969-6474&volume=16&issue=4&spage=276&epage=289&date=2009&atitle=The+thinking+styles+of+human+resource+practitionersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, LF: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, LF=rp00988en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09696470910960374en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69949170056en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175465en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69949170056&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage276en_HK
dc.identifier.epage289en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHiggins, P=7202139062en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, LF=15039838600en_HK

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