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Article: Sexuality Education in China: The Conflict between Reality and Ideology

TitleSexuality Education in China: The Conflict between Reality and Ideology
Authors
KeywordsSexuality education
Chinese adolescent
Educational reform
Issue Date2009
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02188791.asp
Citation
Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 2009, v. 29 n. 4, p. 469-480 How to Cite?
AbstractThe December 2008 release of China's new Guidelines for health education in primary and secondary schools by the Ministry of Education addressed many of the concerns arising from the academic and popular discourse on Chinese adolescent sexuality and sexuality education. The focus of this reform, common with similar reforms elsewhere in Asia and the West, aims at promoting adolescent sexual health and countering the associated social and public health problems. However, unlike adolescents in other countries, Chinese adolescents are constructing their sexuality in a unique socio-economic context with strong influences from deeply rooted puritan Confucian norms and values. Situating adolescent sexuality construction and the new guidelines within such multiple discourses, this article examines the changes in the new guidelines, with particular attention to the distinctive Chinese characteristics of sexuality construction. Based on a large sample empirical study, the paper concurrently explores how Chinese adolescents negotiate the development of their sexuality by investigating sexuality-related attitudes, behaviours, and sources of sexuality-related information. It reveals that though the incidence of Chinese adolescents engaging in sexual behaviours is low compared to their Western counterparts, their attitudes toward sexuality are becoming increasingly liberal. It also indicates that this abstinence-based policy may be deemed justifiable according to the low incidence of sexual intercourse at the moment, but may be viewed as problematic if it has the potential to disempower adolescents from protecting themselves from other health-compromising risks. Thus, for future policy development, the authorities should consider ways they could empower adolescents to address these challenges.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125490
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.370
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorKing, MEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWinter, SJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:34:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:34:26Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Journal of Education, 2009, v. 29 n. 4, p. 469-480en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0218-8791en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125490-
dc.description.abstractThe December 2008 release of China's new Guidelines for health education in primary and secondary schools by the Ministry of Education addressed many of the concerns arising from the academic and popular discourse on Chinese adolescent sexuality and sexuality education. The focus of this reform, common with similar reforms elsewhere in Asia and the West, aims at promoting adolescent sexual health and countering the associated social and public health problems. However, unlike adolescents in other countries, Chinese adolescents are constructing their sexuality in a unique socio-economic context with strong influences from deeply rooted puritan Confucian norms and values. Situating adolescent sexuality construction and the new guidelines within such multiple discourses, this article examines the changes in the new guidelines, with particular attention to the distinctive Chinese characteristics of sexuality construction. Based on a large sample empirical study, the paper concurrently explores how Chinese adolescents negotiate the development of their sexuality by investigating sexuality-related attitudes, behaviours, and sources of sexuality-related information. It reveals that though the incidence of Chinese adolescents engaging in sexual behaviours is low compared to their Western counterparts, their attitudes toward sexuality are becoming increasingly liberal. It also indicates that this abstinence-based policy may be deemed justifiable according to the low incidence of sexual intercourse at the moment, but may be viewed as problematic if it has the potential to disempower adolescents from protecting themselves from other health-compromising risks. Thus, for future policy development, the authorities should consider ways they could empower adolescents to address these challenges.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02188791.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Journal of Educationen_HK
dc.subjectSexuality education-
dc.subjectChinese adolescent-
dc.subjectEducational reform-
dc.titleSexuality Education in China: The Conflict between Reality and Ideologyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0218-8791&volume=29 &issue=4&spage=469&epage=480&date=2009&atitle=Sexuality+Education+in+China:+The+Conflict+between+Reality+and+Ideologyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKing, ME: mark.king@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWinter, SJ: sjwinter@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKing, ME=rp01341en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWinter, SJ=rp00971en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02188790903309066-
dc.identifier.hkuros182319en_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage469en_HK
dc.identifier.epage480en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274345500006-

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