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Article: Use of prosody by children with severe dysarthria: A Cantonese extension study

TitleUse of prosody by children with severe dysarthria: A Cantonese extension study
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherDelmar Cengage Learning. The Journal's web site is located at http://cengagesites.com/academic/?site=3802
Citation
Journal Of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 2008, v. 16 n. 4, p. 293-299 How to Cite?
AbstractSeveral recent studies have shown that speakers with severe dysarthria can make use of prosody to communicate intentions. Patel and Salata (2006) investigated the abilities of five children with severe dysarthria to convey three pitch levels and three duration lengths to their caregivers, using an interactive computer game. In this extension study, four Cantonese-speaking children with severe dysarthria were asked to produce five durations and five pitch levels. Rising and falling pitch levels were included to simulate the rising and falling lexical tones of Cantonese. Acoustic analysis was performed for all productions to determine the relationship between acoustic cues and listener perception. There was substantial interparticipant and intraparticipant variability in the children's productions and in caregiver accuracy. However, accuracy was above chance level for a number of prosodic targets for each speaker. Some of the perceptual responses could be easily explained by the acoustic data, where clear distinctions were apparent. However, in other cases there was much overlap in the acoustic signal, suggesting that listeners were employing additional cues. The results of this study strengthen previous findings that prosody can be used reliably by speakers with severe dysarthria to communicate with familiar partners. Further cross-linguistic studies would be informative. Copyright © 2008 Delmar Cengage Learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125480
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 0.18
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.234
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, JFCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:33:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:33:53Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 2008, v. 16 n. 4, p. 293-299en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1065-1438en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125480-
dc.description.abstractSeveral recent studies have shown that speakers with severe dysarthria can make use of prosody to communicate intentions. Patel and Salata (2006) investigated the abilities of five children with severe dysarthria to convey three pitch levels and three duration lengths to their caregivers, using an interactive computer game. In this extension study, four Cantonese-speaking children with severe dysarthria were asked to produce five durations and five pitch levels. Rising and falling pitch levels were included to simulate the rising and falling lexical tones of Cantonese. Acoustic analysis was performed for all productions to determine the relationship between acoustic cues and listener perception. There was substantial interparticipant and intraparticipant variability in the children's productions and in caregiver accuracy. However, accuracy was above chance level for a number of prosodic targets for each speaker. Some of the perceptual responses could be easily explained by the acoustic data, where clear distinctions were apparent. However, in other cases there was much overlap in the acoustic signal, suggesting that listeners were employing additional cues. The results of this study strengthen previous findings that prosody can be used reliably by speakers with severe dysarthria to communicate with familiar partners. Further cross-linguistic studies would be informative. Copyright © 2008 Delmar Cengage Learning.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherDelmar Cengage Learning. The Journal's web site is located at http://cengagesites.com/academic/?site=3802en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Speech-Language Pathologyen_HK
dc.titleUse of prosody by children with severe dysarthria: A Cantonese extension studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1065-1438&volume=16&issue=4&spage=293&epage=299&date=2008&atitle=Use+of+prosody+by+children+with+severe+dysarthria:+a+Cantonese+extension+study-
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, TL: tara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, TL=rp00970en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951684421en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175341en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951684421&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage293en_HK
dc.identifier.epage299en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehill, TL=7004098633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatel, R=35238107300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, JFC=55343679500en_HK

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