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Article: Associations among measures of perfectionism, self-concept and academic achievement identified in primary school students in Hong Kong

TitleAssociations among measures of perfectionism, self-concept and academic achievement identified in primary school students in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAcademic Achievement
Measures (Individuals)
Foreign Countries
Self Concept
Educational Counseling
Issue Date2009
PublisherWorld Council for Gifted & Talented Children. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.worldgifted.ca/international.html
Citation
Gifted and Talented International, 2009, v. 24 n. 1, p. 147-154 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated relationships among measures of perfectionism, academic self-concept, and academic achievement in fourth and fifth grade children from selective primary schools in Hong Kong where admission involves strict assessment of students' aptitude and potential. Based on their overall academic performance 331 students were recruited, with half the sample comprising high achievers and the other half lower achievers in their respective cohorts. A 37-item questionnaire adapted from the 'Almost Perfect Scale-Revised' (APS-R) (Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001) and the 'Self-Description Questionnaire I' (SDQ) (Marsh, Relich, & Smith, 1983) was administered in a classroom setting. Dependent upon their APS-R scores, participants were sorted into three comparison groups: (i) adaptive perfectionists (ii) maladaptive perfectionists and (iii) non-perfectionists. Pearson correlation, univariate analysis, hierarchical regression analysis and independent-samples t-tests were employed to assess the links among the variables. Results showed perfectionism was directly and indirectly correlated to academic achievement, with academic self-concept as a significant mediator. High achievers were associated with adaptive perfectionism and high academic self-concept. The present findings reflect the distinctive roles of perfectionism in the personal and cognitive developments of primary school students often been downplayed or overlooked in China. Implications for future research and educational guidance are suggested. (Contains 2 tables.)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125461
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFong, WTRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:32:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:32:47Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGifted and Talented International, 2009, v. 24 n. 1, p. 147-154en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1533-2276en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125461-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated relationships among measures of perfectionism, academic self-concept, and academic achievement in fourth and fifth grade children from selective primary schools in Hong Kong where admission involves strict assessment of students' aptitude and potential. Based on their overall academic performance 331 students were recruited, with half the sample comprising high achievers and the other half lower achievers in their respective cohorts. A 37-item questionnaire adapted from the 'Almost Perfect Scale-Revised' (APS-R) (Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001) and the 'Self-Description Questionnaire I' (SDQ) (Marsh, Relich, & Smith, 1983) was administered in a classroom setting. Dependent upon their APS-R scores, participants were sorted into three comparison groups: (i) adaptive perfectionists (ii) maladaptive perfectionists and (iii) non-perfectionists. Pearson correlation, univariate analysis, hierarchical regression analysis and independent-samples t-tests were employed to assess the links among the variables. Results showed perfectionism was directly and indirectly correlated to academic achievement, with academic self-concept as a significant mediator. High achievers were associated with adaptive perfectionism and high academic self-concept. The present findings reflect the distinctive roles of perfectionism in the personal and cognitive developments of primary school students often been downplayed or overlooked in China. Implications for future research and educational guidance are suggested. (Contains 2 tables.)-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWorld Council for Gifted & Talented Children. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.worldgifted.ca/international.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGifted and Talented Internationalen_HK
dc.subjectAcademic Achievement-
dc.subjectMeasures (Individuals)-
dc.subjectForeign Countries-
dc.subjectSelf Concept-
dc.subjectEducational Counseling-
dc.titleAssociations among measures of perfectionism, self-concept and academic achievement identified in primary school students in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1533-2276&volume=24&spage=147&epage=154&date=2009&atitle=Associations+among+measures+of+perfectionism,+self-concept+and+academic+achievement+identified+in+primary+school+students+in+Hong+Kong.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, MT: mtyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, MT=rp00984en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros176435en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros173391-
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage147en_HK
dc.identifier.epage154en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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