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Article: A study of surgeons' postural muscle activity during open, laparoscopic, and endovascular surgery

TitleA study of surgeons' postural muscle activity during open, laparoscopic, and endovascular surgery
Authors
KeywordsElectromyography
Ergonomics
Laparoscopy
Minimally invasive surgery
Neck pain.
Surgeon
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2010, v. 24 n. 7, p. 1712-1721 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Different surgical procedures impose different physical demands on surgeons and high prevalence rates of neck and shoulder pain have been reported among general surgeons. Past research has examined electromyography in surgeons mainly during simulated conditions of laparoscopic and open surgery but not during real-time operations and not for long durations. The present study compares the neck-shoulder muscle activities in three types of surgery and between different surgeons. The relationships of postural muscle activities to musculoskeletal symptoms and personal factors also are examined. Methods Twenty-five surgeons participated in the study (23 men). Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded in the bilateral cervical erector spinae, upper trapezius, and anterior deltoid muscles during three types of surgical procedures: open, laparoscopic, and endovascular. In each procedure, EMG data were captured for 30 min to more than 1 h. The surgeons were asked to rate any musculoskeletal symptoms before and after surgery. Results The present study showed significantly higher muscle activities in the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius muscles in open surgery compared with endovascular and laparoscopic procedures. Muscle activities were fairly similar between endovascular and laparoscopic surgery. The upper trapezius usually has an important role in stabilizing both the neck and upper limb posture, and this muscle also recorded higher activities in open compared with laparoscopic and endovascular surgeries. Surgeons reported similar degrees of musculoskeletal symptoms in open and laparoscopic surgeries, which were higher than endovascular surgery. Conclusions The present study showed that open surgery imposed significantly greater physical demands on the neck muscles compared with endovascular and laparoscopic surgeries. This may be due to the lighter manual task demands of these minimally invasive surgeries compared with open procedures, which generally required more dynamic movements and more forceful exertions. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125417
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.256
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.426
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Bupa Foundation
Bupa Foundation Medical Research
Funding Information:

The authors express their sincere appreciation to the Bupa Foundation for funding this research project, and thank all of the surgeons who participated in the study. The authors thank the research assistants, Silvana Lau, Y. Y. Wong, Winnie Leung, and Ted Wong; without their help, this project would not be run so smoothly. The authors acknowledge Mr. Raymond Chung from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University for providing expert advice on statistical analysis, and Mr. Man Cheung for the technical advice on EMG data collection and analysis.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, GPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTing, ACWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, JTCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, RCCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SWKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:30:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:30:15Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2010, v. 24 n. 7, p. 1712-1721en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125417-
dc.description.abstractBackground Different surgical procedures impose different physical demands on surgeons and high prevalence rates of neck and shoulder pain have been reported among general surgeons. Past research has examined electromyography in surgeons mainly during simulated conditions of laparoscopic and open surgery but not during real-time operations and not for long durations. The present study compares the neck-shoulder muscle activities in three types of surgery and between different surgeons. The relationships of postural muscle activities to musculoskeletal symptoms and personal factors also are examined. Methods Twenty-five surgeons participated in the study (23 men). Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded in the bilateral cervical erector spinae, upper trapezius, and anterior deltoid muscles during three types of surgical procedures: open, laparoscopic, and endovascular. In each procedure, EMG data were captured for 30 min to more than 1 h. The surgeons were asked to rate any musculoskeletal symptoms before and after surgery. Results The present study showed significantly higher muscle activities in the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius muscles in open surgery compared with endovascular and laparoscopic procedures. Muscle activities were fairly similar between endovascular and laparoscopic surgery. The upper trapezius usually has an important role in stabilizing both the neck and upper limb posture, and this muscle also recorded higher activities in open compared with laparoscopic and endovascular surgeries. Surgeons reported similar degrees of musculoskeletal symptoms in open and laparoscopic surgeries, which were higher than endovascular surgery. Conclusions The present study showed that open surgery imposed significantly greater physical demands on the neck muscles compared with endovascular and laparoscopic surgeries. This may be due to the lighter manual task demands of these minimally invasive surgeries compared with open procedures, which generally required more dynamic movements and more forceful exertions. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.subjectElectromyographyen_HK
dc.subjectErgonomicsen_HK
dc.subjectLaparoscopyen_HK
dc.subjectMinimally invasive surgeryen_HK
dc.subjectNeck pain.en_HK
dc.subjectSurgeonen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshElectromyographyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNecken_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysiciansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPosture - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshShoulderen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurgical Procedures, Operative - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTask Performance and Analysisen_HK
dc.titleA study of surgeons' postural muscle activity during open, laparoscopic, and endovascular surgeryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, JTC: tcjensen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, SWK: wkcheng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, JTC=rp01603en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, SWK=rp00374en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-009-0834-3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20035345en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955662070en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175982en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955662070&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1712en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1721en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279036800028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSzeto, GPY=8927033800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, P=24469553100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTing, ACW=7102858552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, JTC=7005903722en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, RCC=7102940061en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, SWK=7404684779en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6500135-

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