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Article: The perception of lexical tone contrasts in Cantonese children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI)

TitleThe perception of lexical tone contrasts in Cantonese children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI)
Authors
KeywordsCantonese Chinese
Lexical tone perception
Specific language impairment (SLI)
Issue Date2009
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2009, v. 52 n. 6, p. 1493-1509 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study examined the perception of fundamental frequency (f0) patterns by Cantonese children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Participants were 14 five-year-old children with SLI, and 14 age-matched (AM) and 13 four-year-old vocabulary-matched (VM) controls. The children identified a word from familiar word pairs that illustrated the 8 minimally contrastive pairs of the 6 lexical tones. They discriminated the f0 patterns within contrastive tonal pairs in speech and nonspeech stimuli. Results: In tone identification, the SLI group performed worse than the AM group but not the VM group. In tone discrimination, the SLI group did worse than the AM group on 2 contrasts and showed a nonsignificant trend of poorer performance on all contrasts combined. The VM group generally did worse than the AM group. There were no group differences in discrimination performance between speech and nonspeech stimuli. No correlation was found between identification and discrimination performance. Only the normal controls showed a moderate correlation between vocabulary scores and performance in the 2 perception tasks. Conclusion: The SLI group's poor tone identification cannot be accounted for by vocabulary knowledge alone. The group's tone discrimination performance suggests that some children with SLI have a deficit in f0 processing. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125387
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, AMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCiocca, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorYung, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:28:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:28:29Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2009, v. 52 n. 6, p. 1493-1509en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125387-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined the perception of fundamental frequency (f0) patterns by Cantonese children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Participants were 14 five-year-old children with SLI, and 14 age-matched (AM) and 13 four-year-old vocabulary-matched (VM) controls. The children identified a word from familiar word pairs that illustrated the 8 minimally contrastive pairs of the 6 lexical tones. They discriminated the f0 patterns within contrastive tonal pairs in speech and nonspeech stimuli. Results: In tone identification, the SLI group performed worse than the AM group but not the VM group. In tone discrimination, the SLI group did worse than the AM group on 2 contrasts and showed a nonsignificant trend of poorer performance on all contrasts combined. The VM group generally did worse than the AM group. There were no group differences in discrimination performance between speech and nonspeech stimuli. No correlation was found between identification and discrimination performance. Only the normal controls showed a moderate correlation between vocabulary scores and performance in the 2 perception tasks. Conclusion: The SLI group's poor tone identification cannot be accounted for by vocabulary knowledge alone. The group's tone discrimination performance suggests that some children with SLI have a deficit in f0 processing. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCantonese Chineseen_HK
dc.subjectLexical tone perceptionen_HK
dc.subjectSpecific language impairment (SLI)en_HK
dc.subject.meshAcoustic Stimulation-
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshLanguage Disorders-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Acoustics-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Perception-
dc.titleThe perception of lexical tone contrasts in Cantonese children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1092-4388&volume=52&issue=6&spage=1493&epage=1509&date=2009&atitle=The+perception+of+lexical+tone+contrasts+in+Cantonese+children+with+and+without+Specific+Language+Impairment+(SLI)-
dc.identifier.emailWong, AMY: amywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AMY=rp00973en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0170)en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19951926-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-71649109992en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175386en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-71649109992&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1493en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1509en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1558-9102-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272482700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, AMY=7403147564en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCiocca, V=6604000275en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, S=35575614100en_HK

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