File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Reading aloud pseudo-characters by individuals with acquired dyslexia: Evidence for lexically mediated processes in reading Chinese
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleReading aloud pseudo-characters by individuals with acquired dyslexia: Evidence for lexically mediated processes in reading Chinese
 
AuthorsLaw, SP1
Weekes, BS2
Wong, W1
Chiu, K3
 
KeywordsAcquired dyslexia
Lexically mediated processes
Pseudo-character
Reading Chinese
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01690965.asp
 
CitationLanguage And Cognitive Processes, 2009, v. 24 n. 7-8, p. 983-1008 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960802193696
 
AbstractThis study examined a hypothesis discussed in Bi, Han, Weekes, and Shu (2007) of a non-lexical system consisting of correspondence rules between character subcomponents and phonology in reading Chinese. It contrasts with the lexical view stating that reading aloud must be lexically mediated as assumed in all current models of character naming. To contrast these accounts, we asked two Cantonese brain-injured anomic individuals with largely preserved reading abilities to read aloud non-existing phonetic compounds containing a free-standing or a non-free-standing phonetic radical. The lexical view predicts that both subjects should be able to provide plausible responses to pseudo-characters, whereas such a prediction is not made by the non-lexical account. We found that both participants could produce legitimate responses to pseudo-characters, similar to the normal individuals. Furthermore, their responses to complex pseudo-characters were strongly influenced by the presence of free-standing phonetic radicals, lending further support to the lexical view. © 2008 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group.
 
ISSN0169-0965
2013 Impact Factor: 1.930
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960802193696
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000270608300004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SP
 
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, BS
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, W
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:28:09Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:28:09Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractThis study examined a hypothesis discussed in Bi, Han, Weekes, and Shu (2007) of a non-lexical system consisting of correspondence rules between character subcomponents and phonology in reading Chinese. It contrasts with the lexical view stating that reading aloud must be lexically mediated as assumed in all current models of character naming. To contrast these accounts, we asked two Cantonese brain-injured anomic individuals with largely preserved reading abilities to read aloud non-existing phonetic compounds containing a free-standing or a non-free-standing phonetic radical. The lexical view predicts that both subjects should be able to provide plausible responses to pseudo-characters, whereas such a prediction is not made by the non-lexical account. We found that both participants could produce legitimate responses to pseudo-characters, similar to the normal individuals. Furthermore, their responses to complex pseudo-characters were strongly influenced by the presence of free-standing phonetic radicals, lending further support to the lexical view. © 2008 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationLanguage And Cognitive Processes, 2009, v. 24 n. 7-8, p. 983-1008 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960802193696
 
dc.identifier.citeulike4007832
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960802193696
 
dc.identifier.eissn1464-0732
 
dc.identifier.epage1008
 
dc.identifier.hkuros173605
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270608300004
 
dc.identifier.issn0169-0965
2013 Impact Factor: 1.930
 
dc.identifier.issue7-8
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75349099294
 
dc.identifier.spage983
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125381
 
dc.identifier.volume24
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01690965.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage and Cognitive Processes
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsLanguage and Cognitive Processes. Copyright © Psychology Press.
 
dc.subjectAcquired dyslexia
 
dc.subjectLexically mediated processes
 
dc.subjectPseudo-character
 
dc.subjectReading Chinese
 
dc.titleReading aloud pseudo-characters by individuals with acquired dyslexia: Evidence for lexically mediated processes in reading Chinese
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Law, SP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Weekes, BS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, W</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chiu, K</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-10-31T11:28:09Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-10-31T11:28:09Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Language And Cognitive Processes, 2009, v. 24 n. 7-8, p. 983-1008</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0169-0965</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/125381</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>This study examined a hypothesis discussed in Bi, Han, Weekes, and Shu (2007) of a non-lexical system consisting of correspondence rules between character subcomponents and phonology in reading Chinese. It contrasts with the lexical view stating that reading aloud must be lexically mediated as assumed in all current models of character naming. To contrast these accounts, we asked two Cantonese brain-injured anomic individuals with largely preserved reading abilities to read aloud non-existing phonetic compounds containing a free-standing or a non-free-standing phonetic radical. The lexical view predicts that both subjects should be able to provide plausible responses to pseudo-characters, whereas such a prediction is not made by the non-lexical account. We found that both participants could produce legitimate responses to pseudo-characters, similar to the normal individuals. Furthermore, their responses to complex pseudo-characters were strongly influenced by the presence of free-standing phonetic radicals, lending further support to the lexical view. &#169; 2008 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor &amp; Francis Group.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Psychology Press. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01690965.asp</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Language and Cognitive Processes</relation.ispartof>
<rights>Language and Cognitive Processes. Copyright &#169; Psychology Press.</rights>
<subject>Acquired dyslexia</subject>
<subject>Lexically mediated processes</subject>
<subject>Pseudo-character</subject>
<subject>Reading Chinese</subject>
<title>Reading aloud pseudo-characters by individuals with acquired dyslexia: Evidence for lexically mediated processes in reading Chinese</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.openurl>http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&amp;issn=0169-0965&amp;volume=24&amp;issue=7-8&amp;spage=983&amp;epage=1008&amp;date=2009&amp;atitle=Reading+aloud+pseudo-characters+by+individuals+with+acquired+dyslexia:+evidence+for+lexically+mediated+processes+in+reading+Chinese</identifier.openurl>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1080/01690960802193696</identifier.doi>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-75349099294</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>173605</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-75349099294&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>24</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>7-8</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>983</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>1008</identifier.epage>
<identifier.eissn>1464-0732</identifier.eissn>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000270608300004</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>4007832</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Sussex
  3. Tung Wah Hospital