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Article: Differentiating cantonese-speaking preschool children with and without SLI using MLU and lexical diversity (D)

TitleDifferentiating cantonese-speaking preschool children with and without SLI using MLU and lexical diversity (D)
Authors
KeywordsAssessment
Cantonese Chinese
Diagnostic accuracy
Language sampling
Specific language impairment
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2010, v. 53 n. 3, p. 794-799 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: In this study, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of a composite clinical assessment measure based on mean length of utterance (MLU), lexical diversity (D), and age (Klee, Stokes, Wong, Fletcher, & Gavin, 2004) in a second, independent sample of 4-year-old Cantonese-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: The composite measure was calculated from play-based, conversational language samples of 15 children with SLI and 14 children without SLI. Scores were dichotomized and compared to diagnostic outcomes using a reference standard based on clinical judgment supported by test scores. Results: Eleven of 15 children with SLI and 8 of 14 children with typical language skills were correctly classified by the dichotomized composite measure. The measure's sensitivity in this second sample was 73.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 48%-89%); specificity was 57.1% (95% CI 33%-79%); positive likelihood ratio was 1.71 (95% CI 0.87-3.37); and negative likelihood ratio was 0.47 (95% CI 0.18-1.21). Conclusions: The diagnostic accuracy of the composite measure was substantially lower than in the original study, suggesting that it is unlikely to be informative for clinical use in its present form. The value of replication studies is discussed. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125378
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, AMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKlee, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorStokes, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, LBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:27:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:27:59Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2010, v. 53 n. 3, p. 794-799en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125378-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: In this study, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of a composite clinical assessment measure based on mean length of utterance (MLU), lexical diversity (D), and age (Klee, Stokes, Wong, Fletcher, & Gavin, 2004) in a second, independent sample of 4-year-old Cantonese-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Method: The composite measure was calculated from play-based, conversational language samples of 15 children with SLI and 14 children without SLI. Scores were dichotomized and compared to diagnostic outcomes using a reference standard based on clinical judgment supported by test scores. Results: Eleven of 15 children with SLI and 8 of 14 children with typical language skills were correctly classified by the dichotomized composite measure. The measure's sensitivity in this second sample was 73.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 48%-89%); specificity was 57.1% (95% CI 33%-79%); positive likelihood ratio was 1.71 (95% CI 0.87-3.37); and negative likelihood ratio was 0.47 (95% CI 0.18-1.21). Conclusions: The diagnostic accuracy of the composite measure was substantially lower than in the original study, suggesting that it is unlikely to be informative for clinical use in its present form. The value of replication studies is discussed. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAssessmenten_HK
dc.subjectCantonese Chineseen_HK
dc.subjectDiagnostic accuracyen_HK
dc.subjectLanguage samplingen_HK
dc.subjectSpecific language impairmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Language-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshLanguage Disorders - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshSpeech-
dc.subject.meshVocabulary-
dc.titleDifferentiating cantonese-speaking preschool children with and without SLI using MLU and lexical diversity (D)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1092-4388&volume=53&issue=3&spage=794&epage=799&date=2010&atitle=Differentiating+Cantonese-speaking+preschool+children+with+and+without+SLI+using+MLU+and+lexical+diversity+(D)-
dc.identifier.emailWong, AMY: amywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AMY=rp00973en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0195)en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20530389-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953355632en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175597en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953355632&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage794en_HK
dc.identifier.epage799en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278488000018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, AMY=7403147564en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlee, T=6602749425en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStokes, SF=7101743675en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFletcher, P=36106653500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeonard, LB=7101816009en_HK

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