File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Relationship between insomnia and headache in community-based middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women.

TitleRelationship between insomnia and headache in community-based middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women.
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
The Journal Of Headache And Pain, 2010, v. 11 n. 3, p. 187-195 How to Cite?
AbstractLimited studies have investigated the prevalence of insomnia symptoms among individuals with different headache diagnoses and the association between insomnia and headache in subjects with comorbid anxiety and depression. A total of 310 community-dwelling Hong Kong Chinese women aged 40-60 years completed a self-administered questionnaire on headache, sleep difficulties, mood disturbances, and functional impairment. About 31% of the sample complained of recurrent headache unrelated to influenza and the common cold in the past 12 months. The percentages of women diagnosed to have migraine, tension-type headache (TTH), and headache unspecified were 8.4, 15.5 and 7.1%, respectively. The most frequent insomnia complaint was "problem waking up too early" (29.4%), followed by "difficulty staying asleep" (28.0%) and "difficulty falling asleep" (24.4%). Women with headaches were significantly more likely to report insomnia symptoms than those without headaches. There were no significant differences among women with migraine, TTH, and headache unspecified in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression analysis showed that women with insomnia disorder as defined by an insomnia severity index total score >or=8 had 2.2-fold increased risk of reporting recurrent headache, 3.2-fold increased risk of migraine, and 2.3-fold increased risk of TTH, after adjusting for anxiety and depression. Individual insomnia symptoms were not independent predictors. The association between insomnia and headache was stronger in subjects with more frequent headaches. Our findings suggest that insomnia and the associated distress, but not insomnia symptoms alone, is an independent risk factor for recurrent headache in middle-aged women with mixed anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125335
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.029
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:25:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal Of Headache And Pain, 2010, v. 11 n. 3, p. 187-195en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1129-2377en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125335-
dc.description.abstractLimited studies have investigated the prevalence of insomnia symptoms among individuals with different headache diagnoses and the association between insomnia and headache in subjects with comorbid anxiety and depression. A total of 310 community-dwelling Hong Kong Chinese women aged 40-60 years completed a self-administered questionnaire on headache, sleep difficulties, mood disturbances, and functional impairment. About 31% of the sample complained of recurrent headache unrelated to influenza and the common cold in the past 12 months. The percentages of women diagnosed to have migraine, tension-type headache (TTH), and headache unspecified were 8.4, 15.5 and 7.1%, respectively. The most frequent insomnia complaint was "problem waking up too early" (29.4%), followed by "difficulty staying asleep" (28.0%) and "difficulty falling asleep" (24.4%). Women with headaches were significantly more likely to report insomnia symptoms than those without headaches. There were no significant differences among women with migraine, TTH, and headache unspecified in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression analysis showed that women with insomnia disorder as defined by an insomnia severity index total score >or=8 had 2.2-fold increased risk of reporting recurrent headache, 3.2-fold increased risk of migraine, and 2.3-fold increased risk of TTH, after adjusting for anxiety and depression. Individual insomnia symptoms were not independent predictors. The association between insomnia and headache was stronger in subjects with more frequent headaches. Our findings suggest that insomnia and the associated distress, but not insomnia symptoms alone, is an independent risk factor for recurrent headache in middle-aged women with mixed anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofThe journal of headache and painen_HK
dc.titleRelationship between insomnia and headache in community-based middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10194-010-0199-yen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20186559-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3451911-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955292653en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros171877en_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage187en_HK
dc.identifier.epage195en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277450200002-
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, WF=24345897100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CY=35604747700en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6819157-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats