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Article: Autistic disorders and schizophrenia: Related or remote? An anatomical likelihood estimation

TitleAutistic disorders and schizophrenia: Related or remote? An anatomical likelihood estimation
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 8 How to Cite?
AbstractShared genetic and environmental risk factors have been identified for autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. Social interaction, communication, emotion processing, sensorimotor gating and executive function are disrupted in both, stimulating debate about whether these are related conditions. Brain imaging studies constitute an informative and expanding resource to determine whether brain structural phenotype of these disorders is distinct or overlapping. We aimed to synthesize existing datasets characterizing ASD and schizophrenia within a common framework, to quantify their structural similarities. In a novel modification of Anatomical Likelihood Estimation (ALE), 313 foci were extracted from 25 voxel-based studies comprising 660 participants (308 ASD, 352 first-episode schizophrenia) and 801 controls. The results revealed that, compared to controls, lower grey matter volumes within limbic-striato-thalamic circuitry were common to ASD and schizophrenia. Unique features of each disorder included lower grey matter volume in amygdala, caudate, frontal and medial gyrus for schizophrenia and putamen for autism. Thus, in terms of brain volumetrics, ASD and schizophrenia have a clear degree of overlap that may reflect shared etiological mechanisms. However, the distinctive neuroanatomy also mapped in each condition raises the question about how this is arrived in the context of common etiological pressures. © 2010 Cheung et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125331
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
ING Asia/Pacific
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The autism research programme and neuroimaging group in the Department of Psychiatry is supported by a donation from ING Asia/Pacific and the University of Hong Kong funding to Drs GM McAlonan, SE Chua and Prof PC Sham. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:25:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:25:05Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 8en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125331-
dc.description.abstractShared genetic and environmental risk factors have been identified for autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. Social interaction, communication, emotion processing, sensorimotor gating and executive function are disrupted in both, stimulating debate about whether these are related conditions. Brain imaging studies constitute an informative and expanding resource to determine whether brain structural phenotype of these disorders is distinct or overlapping. We aimed to synthesize existing datasets characterizing ASD and schizophrenia within a common framework, to quantify their structural similarities. In a novel modification of Anatomical Likelihood Estimation (ALE), 313 foci were extracted from 25 voxel-based studies comprising 660 participants (308 ASD, 352 first-episode schizophrenia) and 801 controls. The results revealed that, compared to controls, lower grey matter volumes within limbic-striato-thalamic circuitry were common to ASD and schizophrenia. Unique features of each disorder included lower grey matter volume in amygdala, caudate, frontal and medial gyrus for schizophrenia and putamen for autism. Thus, in terms of brain volumetrics, ASD and schizophrenia have a clear degree of overlap that may reflect shared etiological mechanisms. However, the distinctive neuroanatomy also mapped in each condition raises the question about how this is arrived in the context of common etiological pressures. © 2010 Cheung et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAutistic Disorder - diagnosis - etiology - pathology-
dc.subject.meshBrain - pathology-
dc.subject.meshComputational Biology-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - diagnosis - etiology - pathology-
dc.titleAutistic disorders and schizophrenia: Related or remote? An anatomical likelihood estimationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1932-6203&volume=5&issue=8&spage=e12233&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Autistic+Disorders+and+Schizophrenia:+Related+or+Remote?+An+Anatomical+Likelihood+Estimation-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, C: charlton@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, S: sechua@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, G: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, C=rp01574en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, S=rp00438en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, G=rp00475en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0012233en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20805880-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2923607-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957894816en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174146en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187265-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957894816&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee12233-
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281011600012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, C=7202061845en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, K=36706689100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, G=36552327800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, M=36552785900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, C=36613713600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Q=36065644400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, S=7201550427en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, G=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7952236-

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