File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Randomized controlled trial of electro-acupuncture for autism spectrum disorder

TitleRandomized controlled trial of electro-acupuncture for autism spectrum disorder
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThorne Research Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thorne.com/practitioners/alternative_medicine_review.jsp
Citation
Alternative Medicine Review, 2010, v. 15 n. 2, p. 136-146 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy, safety, and compliance of short-term electro-acupuncture for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled, clinical trial. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Children with ASD were randomly assigned to an electro-acupuncture (EA) group (n=30) or a sham electro-acupuncture (SEA) group (n=25) matched by age and severity of autism. The EA group received electro-acupuncture for selected acupoints while the SEA group received sham electro-acupuncture to sham acupoints. A total of 12 EA and SEA sessions over four weeks were given. Primary outcome measures included Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM®), Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R), and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. Secondary outcome measures consisted of Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), Ritvo-Freeman Real Life Scale (RFRLS), Reynell Developmental Language Scale (RDLS), and a standardized parental report. Data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in the language comprehension domain of WeeFIM (p=0.02), self-care caregiver assistant domain of PEDI (p=0.028), and CGI-I (p=0.003) in the EA group compared to the SEA group. As for the parental report, the EA group also showed significantly better social initiation (p=0.01), receptive language (p=0.006), motor skills (p=0.034), coordination (p=0.07), and attention span (p=0.003). More than 70 percent of children with ASD adapted to acupuncture easily, while eight percent had poor acupuncture compliance. Mild side effects of minor superficial bleeding or irritability during acupuncture were observed. CONCLUSION: A short, four-week (12 sessions) course of electro-acupuncture is useful to improve specific functions in children with ASD, especially for language comprehension and self-care ability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125227
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.833
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.437
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, VCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, WXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, WLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:18:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:18:41Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAlternative Medicine Review, 2010, v. 15 n. 2, p. 136-146en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1089-5159en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125227-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy, safety, and compliance of short-term electro-acupuncture for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled, clinical trial. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Children with ASD were randomly assigned to an electro-acupuncture (EA) group (n=30) or a sham electro-acupuncture (SEA) group (n=25) matched by age and severity of autism. The EA group received electro-acupuncture for selected acupoints while the SEA group received sham electro-acupuncture to sham acupoints. A total of 12 EA and SEA sessions over four weeks were given. Primary outcome measures included Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM®), Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R), and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. Secondary outcome measures consisted of Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), Ritvo-Freeman Real Life Scale (RFRLS), Reynell Developmental Language Scale (RDLS), and a standardized parental report. Data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in the language comprehension domain of WeeFIM (p=0.02), self-care caregiver assistant domain of PEDI (p=0.028), and CGI-I (p=0.003) in the EA group compared to the SEA group. As for the parental report, the EA group also showed significantly better social initiation (p=0.01), receptive language (p=0.006), motor skills (p=0.034), coordination (p=0.07), and attention span (p=0.003). More than 70 percent of children with ASD adapted to acupuncture easily, while eight percent had poor acupuncture compliance. Mild side effects of minor superficial bleeding or irritability during acupuncture were observed. CONCLUSION: A short, four-week (12 sessions) course of electro-acupuncture is useful to improve specific functions in children with ASD, especially for language comprehension and self-care ability.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThorne Research Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thorne.com/practitioners/alternative_medicine_review.jspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAlternative Medicine Reviewen_HK
dc.titleRandomized controlled trial of electro-acupuncture for autism spectrum disorderen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, VCN:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, VCN=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid20806998-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954631133en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros178853en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954631133&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage136en_HK
dc.identifier.epage146en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280080600005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VCN=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, WX=8261403900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, WL=36604829700en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats