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Article: Bioactivity-guided identification and cell signaling technology to delineate the immunomodulatory effects of Panax ginseng on human promonocytic U937 cells
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TitleBioactivity-guided identification and cell signaling technology to delineate the immunomodulatory effects of Panax ginseng on human promonocytic U937 cells
 
AuthorsLee, DCW2
Yang, CLH1
Chik, SCC1
Li, JCB2 1
Rong, JH1
Chan, GCF2
Lau, ASY2 1
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.translational-medicine.com/home/
 
CitationJournal Of Translational Medicine, 2009, v. 7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5876-7-34
 
AbstractBackground: Ginseng is believed to have beneficial effects against human diseases, and its active components, ginsenosides, may play critical roles in its diverse physiological actions. However, the mechanisms underlying ginseng's effects remain to be investigated. We hypothesize some biological effects of ginseng are due to its anti-inflammatory effects. Methods: Human promonocytic U937 cells were used to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of ginseng following TNF-α treatment. A global gene expression profile was obtained by using genechip analysis, and specific cytokine expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. HPLC was used to define the composition of ginsenosides in 70% ethanol-water extracts of ginseng. Activation of signalling kinases was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: Seventy percent ethanol-water extracts of ginseng significantly inhibited the transcription and secretion of CXCL-10 following TNF-α stimulation. Nine ginsenosides including Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Rd, Re, Rf, Rg1, Rg3 and Rh1 were identified in our extract by HPLC. Seven out of nine ginsenosides could significantly inhibit TNF-α-induced CXCL-10 expression in U937 cells and give comparable inhibition of CXCL-10 transcription to those with the extract. However, the CXCL-10 suppressive effect of individual ginsenosides was less than that of the crude extract or the mixture of ginsenosides. The CXCL-10 suppression can be correlated with the inactivation of ERK1/2 pathways by ginseng. Conclusion: We showed ginseng suppressed part of the TNF-α-inducible cytokines and signalling proteins in promonocytic cells, suggesting that it exerts its anti-inflammatory property targeting at different levels of TNF-α activity. The anti-inflammatory role of ginseng may be due to the combined effects of ginsenosides, contributing in part to the diverse actions of ginseng in humans. © 2009 Lee et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
ISSN1479-5876
2013 Impact Factor: 3.991
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.767
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5876-7-34
 
PubMed Central IDPMC2689162
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000267240900001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLee, DCW
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, CLH
 
dc.contributor.authorChik, SCC
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, JCB
 
dc.contributor.authorRong, JH
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCF
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, ASY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:18:08Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:18:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ginseng is believed to have beneficial effects against human diseases, and its active components, ginsenosides, may play critical roles in its diverse physiological actions. However, the mechanisms underlying ginseng's effects remain to be investigated. We hypothesize some biological effects of ginseng are due to its anti-inflammatory effects. Methods: Human promonocytic U937 cells were used to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of ginseng following TNF-α treatment. A global gene expression profile was obtained by using genechip analysis, and specific cytokine expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. HPLC was used to define the composition of ginsenosides in 70% ethanol-water extracts of ginseng. Activation of signalling kinases was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: Seventy percent ethanol-water extracts of ginseng significantly inhibited the transcription and secretion of CXCL-10 following TNF-α stimulation. Nine ginsenosides including Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Rd, Re, Rf, Rg1, Rg3 and Rh1 were identified in our extract by HPLC. Seven out of nine ginsenosides could significantly inhibit TNF-α-induced CXCL-10 expression in U937 cells and give comparable inhibition of CXCL-10 transcription to those with the extract. However, the CXCL-10 suppressive effect of individual ginsenosides was less than that of the crude extract or the mixture of ginsenosides. The CXCL-10 suppression can be correlated with the inactivation of ERK1/2 pathways by ginseng. Conclusion: We showed ginseng suppressed part of the TNF-α-inducible cytokines and signalling proteins in promonocytic cells, suggesting that it exerts its anti-inflammatory property targeting at different levels of TNF-α activity. The anti-inflammatory role of ginseng may be due to the combined effects of ginsenosides, contributing in part to the diverse actions of ginseng in humans. © 2009 Lee et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Translational Medicine, 2009, v. 7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5876-7-34
 
dc.identifier.citeulike4519470
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5876-7-34
 
dc.identifier.hkuros179089
 
dc.identifier.hkuros161570
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267240900001
 
dc.identifier.issn1479-5876
2013 Impact Factor: 3.991
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.767
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2689162
 
dc.identifier.pmid19442267
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-66949121846
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125217
 
dc.identifier.volume7
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.translational-medicine.com/home/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Translational Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Translational Medicine. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshChemokine CXCL10 - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshImmunologic Factors - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshPanax - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshPlant Extracts - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshSignal Transduction - drug effects
 
dc.titleBioactivity-guided identification and cell signaling technology to delineate the immunomodulatory effects of Panax ginseng on human promonocytic U937 cells
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong