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Article: Concurrent comparison of epidemiology, clinical presentation and outcome between adult patients suffering from the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus and the seasonal influenza A virus infection

TitleConcurrent comparison of epidemiology, clinical presentation and outcome between adult patients suffering from the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus and the seasonal influenza A virus infection
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.postgradmedj.com
Citation
Postgraduate Medical Journal, 2010, v. 86 n. 1019, p. 515-521 How to Cite?
Abstract
Purpose of study: The demographics, clinical features and outcome of patients with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection were compared with a concurrent cohort of patients with seasonal influenza A infection. Study design: The clinical and microbiological data of hospitalised adult patients admitted between 29 June and 28 October 2009, with pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 or seasonal influenza A infection, were analysed. Results: A total of 186 patients including 69 pandemic A (H1N1) and 117 seasonal influenza were analysed. The majority (75%) under 50 years of age had pandemic A (H1N1). Compared with seasonal influenza, pandemic A (H1N1) patients were younger (median age 47 years vs 76 years, p<0.001), less likely to have lower respiratory tract symptoms (46.4% vs 66.7%, p=0.007), but more likely to be obese (5.8% vs 0%, p=0.018), pregnant (7.2% vs 0.9%, p=0.027) or have no underlying predisposing factors (24.6% vs 5.1%, p<0.001). Patients with pandemic A (H1N1) were more likely to receive oseltamivir (91.3% vs 40.2%, p<0.001), but less likely to receive antibiotics (75.4% vs 90.6%, p=0.005). Respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission for all four patients with pandemic A (H1N1), but only for one of three patients with seasonal influenza. There were no statistical significant differences in the rate of intensive care unit admission or death. Conclusions: In addition to age, several clinical parameters were different between pandemic A (H1N1) and seasonal influenza. However, since both seasonal and pandemic influenza can lead to significant morbidity and mortality, the impact of pre-existing seasonal influenza should not be underestimated during the pandemic period.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125043
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.549
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Providence Foundation Limited
University Grant Council
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RICID) of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

Providence Foundation Limited in memory of the late Dr Lui Hac Minh, the University Grant Council, and the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RICID) of the Food and Health Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, IWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, IFNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:08:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:08:15Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPostgraduate Medical Journal, 2010, v. 86 n. 1019, p. 515-521en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0032-5473en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125043-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of study: The demographics, clinical features and outcome of patients with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection were compared with a concurrent cohort of patients with seasonal influenza A infection. Study design: The clinical and microbiological data of hospitalised adult patients admitted between 29 June and 28 October 2009, with pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 or seasonal influenza A infection, were analysed. Results: A total of 186 patients including 69 pandemic A (H1N1) and 117 seasonal influenza were analysed. The majority (75%) under 50 years of age had pandemic A (H1N1). Compared with seasonal influenza, pandemic A (H1N1) patients were younger (median age 47 years vs 76 years, p<0.001), less likely to have lower respiratory tract symptoms (46.4% vs 66.7%, p=0.007), but more likely to be obese (5.8% vs 0%, p=0.018), pregnant (7.2% vs 0.9%, p=0.027) or have no underlying predisposing factors (24.6% vs 5.1%, p<0.001). Patients with pandemic A (H1N1) were more likely to receive oseltamivir (91.3% vs 40.2%, p<0.001), but less likely to receive antibiotics (75.4% vs 90.6%, p=0.005). Respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission for all four patients with pandemic A (H1N1), but only for one of three patients with seasonal influenza. There were no statistical significant differences in the rate of intensive care unit admission or death. Conclusions: In addition to age, several clinical parameters were different between pandemic A (H1N1) and seasonal influenza. However, since both seasonal and pandemic influenza can lead to significant morbidity and mortality, the impact of pre-existing seasonal influenza should not be underestimated during the pandemic period.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.postgradmedj.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPostgraduate Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleConcurrent comparison of epidemiology, clinical presentation and outcome between adult patients suffering from the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus and the seasonal influenza A virus infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0032-5473&volume=86&issue=1019&spage=515&epage=521&date=2010&atitle=Concurrent+comparison+of+epidemiology,+clinical+presentation+and+outcome+between+adult+patients+suffering+from+the+pandemic+influenza+A+(H1N1)+2009+virus+and+seasonal+influenza+A+virus+infection-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW:kelvinto@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSY:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHung, IFN:ivanhung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, H:herman@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSY=rp00395en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHung, IFN=rp00508en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, H=rp00519en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/pgmj.2009.096206en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20693151en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956935174en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros179943en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77956935174&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume86en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1019en_HK
dc.identifier.spage515en_HK
dc.identifier.epage521en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1469-0756-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282632800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTo, KKW=14323807300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSY=13310021400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, IWS=24464179500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, IFN=7006103457en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, H=7006070596en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

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