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Article: The relation of interleukin 17 (IL-17) and IL-23 to Th1/Th2 cytokines and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleThe relation of interleukin 17 (IL-17) and IL-23 to Th1/Th2 cytokines and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
KeywordsCytokines
Disease activity
Systemic lupus erythematosus
Issue Date2010
PublisherJournal of Rheumatology Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jrheum.com
Citation
Journal Of Rheumatology, 2010, v. 37 n. 10, p. 2046-2052 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) was recently linked to pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but its relation to disease activity has not been well characterized. We examined the relation between serum levels of Th17 (IL-17, IL-23), Th1 (IL-12, interferon-γ), Th2 (IL-10, IL-6, IL-4) cytokines and disease activity in patients with SLE. Methods. Serum cytokines were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Disease activity was determined by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), anti-dsDNA antibody, and C3 and C4 levels. Results. Serum levels of IL-17 (p < 0.001), IL-6 (p = 0.006) and IL-10 (p < 0.001) were higher in SLE patients (n = 70) compared to healthy controls (n = 36). Higher serum IL-23 level was found in patients with active disease with cutaneous manifestations (p = 0.004) and serositis (p = 0.04) compared to those without. Serum IL-17 level above the detection limit was more frequently found in patients who had active lupus nephritis (11/23, 47.8%) (p = 0.002), nonrenal active disease (9/15, 60%) (p = 0.001), and inactive lupus (21/32, 65.6%) (p < 0.001) compared to healthy controls (0%). Serum IL-17 levels were otherwise comparable between these 3 groups of patients and were not related to SLEDAI, glomerular filtration rate, activity or chronicity score and ISN/RPS criteria class among patients with active lupus nephritis. There was no significant correlation between serum IL-17/IL-23 and Th1 or Th2 cytokine levels. Conclusion. SLE patients had higher serum IL-17 levels than healthy controls. Elevated serum IL-23 was found in patients with inflammatory manifestations including cutaneous involvement and serositis. The lack of correlation between Th17, Th1, and Th2 cytokines suggested independent regulatory mechanisms for these cytokines. The Journal of Rheumatology Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125031
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.187
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong20084159001
Funding Information:

Supported by Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research (20084159001) from the University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, HJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:07:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:07:36Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Rheumatology, 2010, v. 37 n. 10, p. 2046-2052en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0315-162Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125031-
dc.description.abstractObjective. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) was recently linked to pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but its relation to disease activity has not been well characterized. We examined the relation between serum levels of Th17 (IL-17, IL-23), Th1 (IL-12, interferon-γ), Th2 (IL-10, IL-6, IL-4) cytokines and disease activity in patients with SLE. Methods. Serum cytokines were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Disease activity was determined by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), anti-dsDNA antibody, and C3 and C4 levels. Results. Serum levels of IL-17 (p < 0.001), IL-6 (p = 0.006) and IL-10 (p < 0.001) were higher in SLE patients (n = 70) compared to healthy controls (n = 36). Higher serum IL-23 level was found in patients with active disease with cutaneous manifestations (p = 0.004) and serositis (p = 0.04) compared to those without. Serum IL-17 level above the detection limit was more frequently found in patients who had active lupus nephritis (11/23, 47.8%) (p = 0.002), nonrenal active disease (9/15, 60%) (p = 0.001), and inactive lupus (21/32, 65.6%) (p < 0.001) compared to healthy controls (0%). Serum IL-17 levels were otherwise comparable between these 3 groups of patients and were not related to SLEDAI, glomerular filtration rate, activity or chronicity score and ISN/RPS criteria class among patients with active lupus nephritis. There was no significant correlation between serum IL-17/IL-23 and Th1 or Th2 cytokine levels. Conclusion. SLE patients had higher serum IL-17 levels than healthy controls. Elevated serum IL-23 was found in patients with inflammatory manifestations including cutaneous involvement and serositis. The lack of correlation between Th17, Th1, and Th2 cytokines suggested independent regulatory mechanisms for these cytokines. The Journal of Rheumatology Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJournal of Rheumatology Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jrheum.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rheumatologyen_HK
dc.subjectCytokinesen_HK
dc.subjectDisease activityen_HK
dc.subjectSystemic lupus erythematosusen_HK
dc.subject.meshCytokines - blood - immunology-
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-17 - blood - immunology-
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-23 - blood - immunology-
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic - blood - immunology - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshTh1 Cells - immunology-
dc.subject.meshTh2 Cells - immunology-
dc.titleThe relation of interleukin 17 (IL-17) and IL-23 to Th1/Th2 cytokines and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0315-162X&volume=37&issue=10&spage=2046&epage=2052&date=2010&atitle=The+relation+of+interleukin+17+(IL-17)+and+IL-23+to+Th1/Th2+cytokines+and+disease+activity+in+systemic+lupus+erythematosus-
dc.identifier.emailMok, MY:temy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS:cslau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMok, MY=rp00490en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3899/jrheum.100293en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20682672en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957867731en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174741en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195385-
dc.identifier.hkuros195401-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957867731&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2046en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2052en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282864400012-
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, MY=7006024184en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, HJ=37035302700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, Y=35148230000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_HK

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