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Article: Response: Prognosis of stage I/II nonnasal extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma

TitleResponse: Prognosis of stage I/II nonnasal extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAmerican Society of Hematology. The Journal's web site is located at http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/
Citation
Blood, 2009, v. 113 n. 24, p. 6261-6262 How to Cite?
AbstractResponse We thank Suzuki et al for comparing the clinical outcome of their 10 patients with localized (stage I/II) nonnasal, extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKL) from a Japanese multicenter collection (3-year overall survival; 41%), to the 18 cases with similar disease from our international study (3-year overall survival; 12%).1 They suggest that low-stage extranasal ENKL may carry a more favorable prognosis. Due to differences in case selection criteria, it is difficult to resolve this discrepancy in a retrospective fashion. The small number of cases of low-stage extranasal ENKL in both studies means that this is a rare clinical presentation. From our understanding, most of the Japanese cases were dermatologic referrals. This category of cases was not submitted to our retrospective study. Indeed; none of our 18 stage I/II extranasal cases come from the 4 Japanese centers that participated in our study.1 In contrast, only 2 of the 18 stage I/II cases from our study were cutaneous ENKL. The majority affected the alimentary tract (n = 7) and muscles (n = 5). Such bias may have led to the omission of a Japanese subcategory of limited stage cutaneous ENKL with a good prognosis, that is either not seen or missed in other parts of the world.2 It is also possible that with more meticulous staging, that is, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)– encoded early small RNA (EBER) staining of marrow3 and whole body positive emission tomography (PET) scanning,4 apparent low-stage extranasal ENKL cases with a poor outcome would actually be upstaged. Given these uncertainties, the prognosis for bona fide low-stage extranasal ENKL (cutaneous and noncutaneous) remains unclear. In this setting, other ancillary variables; such as the size and number of lesions, biochemical and hematologic factors, and EBV DNA load, may also help to predict outcome. Future prospective studies of a larger number of well-characterized cases are needed to resolve this issue.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125029
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.841
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.395
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, WY-
dc.contributor.authorWeisenburger, DD-
dc.contributor.authorLiang, RHS-
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:07:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:07:29Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationBlood, 2009, v. 113 n. 24, p. 6261-6262-
dc.identifier.issn0006-4971-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125029-
dc.description.abstractResponse We thank Suzuki et al for comparing the clinical outcome of their 10 patients with localized (stage I/II) nonnasal, extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKL) from a Japanese multicenter collection (3-year overall survival; 41%), to the 18 cases with similar disease from our international study (3-year overall survival; 12%).1 They suggest that low-stage extranasal ENKL may carry a more favorable prognosis. Due to differences in case selection criteria, it is difficult to resolve this discrepancy in a retrospective fashion. The small number of cases of low-stage extranasal ENKL in both studies means that this is a rare clinical presentation. From our understanding, most of the Japanese cases were dermatologic referrals. This category of cases was not submitted to our retrospective study. Indeed; none of our 18 stage I/II extranasal cases come from the 4 Japanese centers that participated in our study.1 In contrast, only 2 of the 18 stage I/II cases from our study were cutaneous ENKL. The majority affected the alimentary tract (n = 7) and muscles (n = 5). Such bias may have led to the omission of a Japanese subcategory of limited stage cutaneous ENKL with a good prognosis, that is either not seen or missed in other parts of the world.2 It is also possible that with more meticulous staging, that is, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)– encoded early small RNA (EBER) staining of marrow3 and whole body positive emission tomography (PET) scanning,4 apparent low-stage extranasal ENKL cases with a poor outcome would actually be upstaged. Given these uncertainties, the prognosis for bona fide low-stage extranasal ENKL (cutaneous and noncutaneous) remains unclear. In this setting, other ancillary variables; such as the size and number of lesions, biochemical and hematologic factors, and EBV DNA load, may also help to predict outcome. Future prospective studies of a larger number of well-characterized cases are needed to resolve this issue.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Hematology. The Journal's web site is located at http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofBlood-
dc.rightsThis research was originally published in The Hematologist: ASH News and Reports. Author(s). Title. The Hematologist: ASH News and Reports. Year;Vol,Issue:pp-pp. © the American Society of Hematology.-
dc.titleResponse: Prognosis of stage I/II nonnasal extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0006-4971&volume=113&spage=6261&epage=6262&date=2009&atitle=Reply+to+Suzuki+et+al:+Prognosis+of+stage+I/II+non-nasal+extranodal+NK/T+cell+lymphoma+for+the+International+Peripheral+T-cell+Lymphoma+Projecten_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, WY: auwing@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLiang, RHS: rliang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, RHS=rp00345-
dc.identifier.doi10.1182/blood-2009-04-214031-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70449334558-
dc.identifier.hkuros180738-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70449334558&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpage-
dc.identifier.volume113-
dc.identifier.issue24-
dc.identifier.spage6261-
dc.identifier.epage6262-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267147100035-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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