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Article: Queen Mary Utilization Of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Use of antihypertensive drug classes in the Hypertension Clinic 1996-2004
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TitleQueen Mary Utilization Of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Use of antihypertensive drug classes in the Hypertension Clinic 1996-2004
 
AuthorsCheung, BMY1
Wong, YL1 2
Lau, CP1
 
Keywordsβ-blocker
Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor
Calcium channel blocker
Drug utilization
Hypertension
Thiazide diuretic
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCP
 
CitationBritish Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2005, v. 60 n. 1, p. 90-97 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2005.02388.x
 
AbstractBackground: Utilization of antihypertensive drugs in the hypertension outpatient clinic is surveyed periodically in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study (QUADS). Methods: Two hundred and fifty-one patients (123 men, 128 women) were interviewed in April to December 1996, 439 patients (232 men, 207 women) in January to December 99 and 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) in April to May 2004. Their case notes were reviewed. Results: The percentages of patients receiving no drug (lifestyle modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 7%, 48%, 36%, 7%, 3%, respectively, in 1996; 14%, 34%, 36%, 13% and 1%, respectively, in 1999; and 3%, 30%, 40%, 22% and 6%, respectively, in 2004. The number of drugs correlated with age and overweight. In 1996, 51% patients received calcium channel blockers (CCB); 46% β-blockers (BB); 32% angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI); 15% thiazide diuretics; 5% α-blockers; and 0% angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). In 1999, the respective figures were 52% CCB, 49% BB, 24% ACEI, 22% thiazide diuretics, 4% α-blockers and 2% ARB. In 2004, the respective figures were 65% CCB, 64% BB, 33% ACEI, 24% thiazide diuretics, 4% α-blockers and 7% ARB. Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects. Only 11% were on α statin and 9% on aspirin. Blood pressure on treatment was 147 ± 21/84 ± 11 mmHg in 1999 and 144 ± 21/82 ± 11 mmHg in 2004. Conclusions: Increasingly, multiple drugs were used for blood pressure control. Blood pressure control needs improvement, especially in diabetics. CCBs and BBs were consistently popular. Thiazide diuretics, ARBs, statins and aspirin were underused, despite favourable clinical trial evidence. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
ISSN0306-5251
2012 Impact Factor: 3.578
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.150
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2005.02388.x
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1884897
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000229912600013
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, CP
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:04:00Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:04:00Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Utilization of antihypertensive drugs in the hypertension outpatient clinic is surveyed periodically in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study (QUADS). Methods: Two hundred and fifty-one patients (123 men, 128 women) were interviewed in April to December 1996, 439 patients (232 men, 207 women) in January to December 99 and 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) in April to May 2004. Their case notes were reviewed. Results: The percentages of patients receiving no drug (lifestyle modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 7%, 48%, 36%, 7%, 3%, respectively, in 1996; 14%, 34%, 36%, 13% and 1%, respectively, in 1999; and 3%, 30%, 40%, 22% and 6%, respectively, in 2004. The number of drugs correlated with age and overweight. In 1996, 51% patients received calcium channel blockers (CCB); 46% β-blockers (BB); 32% angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI); 15% thiazide diuretics; 5% α-blockers; and 0% angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). In 1999, the respective figures were 52% CCB, 49% BB, 24% ACEI, 22% thiazide diuretics, 4% α-blockers and 2% ARB. In 2004, the respective figures were 65% CCB, 64% BB, 33% ACEI, 24% thiazide diuretics, 4% α-blockers and 7% ARB. Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects. Only 11% were on α statin and 9% on aspirin. Blood pressure on treatment was 147 ± 21/84 ± 11 mmHg in 1999 and 144 ± 21/82 ± 11 mmHg in 2004. Conclusions: Increasingly, multiple drugs were used for blood pressure control. Blood pressure control needs improvement, especially in diabetics. CCBs and BBs were consistently popular. Thiazide diuretics, ARBs, statins and aspirin were underused, despite favourable clinical trial evidence. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2005, v. 60 n. 1, p. 90-97 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2005.02388.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike232200
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2005.02388.x
 
dc.identifier.epage97
 
dc.identifier.hkuros180186
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229912600013
 
dc.identifier.issn0306-5251
2012 Impact Factor: 3.578
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.150
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1884897
 
dc.identifier.pmid15963099
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21744449230
 
dc.identifier.spage90
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124965
 
dc.identifier.volume60
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCP
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAntihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshDrug Utilization Review
 
dc.subject.meshHypertension - drug therapy
 
dc.subjectβ-blocker
 
dc.subjectAngiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor
 
dc.subjectCalcium channel blocker
 
dc.subjectDrug utilization
 
dc.subjectHypertension
 
dc.subjectThiazide diuretic
 
dc.titleQueen Mary Utilization Of Antihypertensive Drugs Study: Use of antihypertensive drug classes in the Hypertension Clinic 1996-2004
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Background: Utilization of antihypertensive drugs in the hypertension outpatient clinic is surveyed periodically in the Queen Mary Utilization of Antihypertensive Drugs Study (QUADS). Methods: Two hundred and fifty-one patients (123 men, 128 women) were interviewed in April to December 1996, 439 patients (232 men, 207 women) in January to December 99 and 228 patients (109 men, 119 women) in April to May 2004. Their case notes were reviewed. Results: The percentages of patients receiving no drug (lifestyle modification), one, two, three and over three drugs were 7%, 48%, 36%, 7%, 3%, respectively, in 1996; 14%, 34%, 36%, 13% and 1%, respectively, in 1999; and 3%, 30%, 40%, 22% and 6%, respectively, in 2004. The number of drugs correlated with age and overweight. In 1996, 51% patients received calcium channel blockers (CCB); 46% &#946;-blockers (BB); 32% angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI); 15% thiazide diuretics; 5% &#945;-blockers; and 0% angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). In 1999, the respective figures were 52% CCB, 49% BB, 24% ACEI, 22% thiazide diuretics, 4% &#945;-blockers and 2% ARB. In 2004, the respective figures were 65% CCB, 64% BB, 33% ACEI, 24% thiazide diuretics, 4% &#945;-blockers and 7% ARB. Fewer patients on BBs reported side-effects. Only 11% were on &#945; statin and 9% on aspirin. Blood pressure on treatment was 147 &#177; 21/84 &#177; 11 mmHg in 1999 and 144 &#177; 21/82 &#177; 11 mmHg in 2004. Conclusions: Increasingly, multiple drugs were used for blood pressure control. Blood pressure control needs improvement, especially in diabetics. CCBs and BBs were consistently popular. Thiazide diuretics, ARBs, statins and aspirin were underused, despite favourable clinical trial evidence. &#169; 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Sunderland