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Article: Induced pluripotent stem cell technology in regenerative medicine and biology

TitleInduced pluripotent stem cell technology in regenerative medicine and biology
Authors
KeywordsDisease modeling
Embryonic stem cells
Induced pluripotent stem cells
Regenerative medicine
Reprogramming
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC.
Citation
Advances In Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology, 2010, v. 123, p. 127-141 How to Cite?
AbstractThe potential of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for regenerative medicine is unquestionable, but practical and ethical considerations have hampered clinical application and research. In an attempt to overcome these issues, the conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells similar to ESCs, commonly termed nuclear reprogramming, has been a top objective of contemporary biology. More than 40 years ago, King, Briggs, and Gurdon pioneered somatic cell nuclear reprogramming in frogs, and in 1981 Evans successfully isolated mouse ESCs. In 1997 Wilmut and collaborators produced the first cloned mammal using nuclear transfer, and then Thomson obtained human ESCs from in vitro fertilized blastocysts in 1998. Over the last 2 decades we have also seen remarkable findings regarding how ESC behavior is controlled, the importance of which should not be underestimated. This knowledge allowed the laboratory of Shinya Yamanaka to overcome brilliantly conceptual and technical barriers in 2006 and generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts by overexpressing defined combinations of ESC-enriched transcription factors. Here, we discuss some important implications of human iPSCs for biology and medicine and also point to possible future directions. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124938
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.911
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.527
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPei, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhuang, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEsteban, MAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:02:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:02:32Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology, 2010, v. 123, p. 127-141en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0724-6145en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124938-
dc.description.abstractThe potential of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for regenerative medicine is unquestionable, but practical and ethical considerations have hampered clinical application and research. In an attempt to overcome these issues, the conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells similar to ESCs, commonly termed nuclear reprogramming, has been a top objective of contemporary biology. More than 40 years ago, King, Briggs, and Gurdon pioneered somatic cell nuclear reprogramming in frogs, and in 1981 Evans successfully isolated mouse ESCs. In 1997 Wilmut and collaborators produced the first cloned mammal using nuclear transfer, and then Thomson obtained human ESCs from in vitro fertilized blastocysts in 1998. Over the last 2 decades we have also seen remarkable findings regarding how ESC behavior is controlled, the importance of which should not be underestimated. This knowledge allowed the laboratory of Shinya Yamanaka to overcome brilliantly conceptual and technical barriers in 2006 and generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts by overexpressing defined combinations of ESC-enriched transcription factors. Here, we discuss some important implications of human iPSCs for biology and medicine and also point to possible future directions. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC.-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectDisease modelingen_HK
dc.subjectEmbryonic stem cellsen_HK
dc.subjectInduced pluripotent stem cellsen_HK
dc.subjectRegenerative medicineen_HK
dc.subjectReprogrammingen_HK
dc.titleInduced pluripotent stem cell technology in regenerative medicine and biologyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0724-6145&volume=123&spage=127&epage=141&date=2010&atitle=Induced+pluripotent+stem+cell+technology+in+regenerative+medicine+and+biology-
dc.identifier.emailTse, HF:hftse@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HF=rp00428en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/10_2010_72en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20549468-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82055172535en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros173636en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82055172535&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume123en_HK
dc.identifier.spage127en_HK
dc.identifier.epage141en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283765600005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPei, D=7102806599en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, J=16067616200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhuang, Q=36107302900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HF=7006070805en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEsteban, MA=35591774300en_HK

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