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Article: Exhaled droplets due to talking and coughing

TitleExhaled droplets due to talking and coughing
Authors
KeywordsAirborne infection
Coughing
Droplets
Talking
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://publishing.royalsociety.org/index.cfm?page=1572
Citation
Journal Of The Royal Society Interface, 2009, v. 6 SUPPL. 6, p. S703-S714 How to Cite?
AbstractRespiratory infections can be spread via 'contact' with droplets from expiratory activities such as talking, coughing and sneezing, and also from aerosol-generating clinical procedures. Droplet sizes predominately determine the times they can remain airborne, the possibility of spread of infectious diseases and thus the strategies for controlling the infections. While significant inconsistencies exist between the existing measured data on respiratory droplets generated during expiratory activities, a food dye was used in the mouth during measurements of large droplets, which made the expiratory activities 'unnatural'. We carried out a series of experiments using glass slides and a microscope as well as an aerosol spectrometer to measure the number and size of respiratory droplets produced from the mouth of healthy individuals during talking and coughing with and without a food dye. The total mass of respiratory droplets was measured using a mask, plastic bag with tissue and an electronic balance with a high precision. Considerable subject variability was observed and the average size of droplets captured using glass slides and microscope was about 50-100 μm. Smaller droplets were also detected by the aerosol spectrometer. More droplets seemed to be generated when a food dye was used. © 2009 The Royal Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124862
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.818
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.622
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaHKU 7150/06
Funding Information:

Ethical approval for the experimental study was obtained from the Institutional Review Board of the University of Hong Kong/Hospital Authority Hong Kong West Cluster. The work was supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (project no. HKU 7150/06). We thank post graduate student volunteers at the Department of Mechanical Engineering for participating in the tests.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXie, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:58:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:58:18Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Royal Society Interface, 2009, v. 6 SUPPL. 6, p. S703-S714en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1742-5689en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124862-
dc.description.abstractRespiratory infections can be spread via 'contact' with droplets from expiratory activities such as talking, coughing and sneezing, and also from aerosol-generating clinical procedures. Droplet sizes predominately determine the times they can remain airborne, the possibility of spread of infectious diseases and thus the strategies for controlling the infections. While significant inconsistencies exist between the existing measured data on respiratory droplets generated during expiratory activities, a food dye was used in the mouth during measurements of large droplets, which made the expiratory activities 'unnatural'. We carried out a series of experiments using glass slides and a microscope as well as an aerosol spectrometer to measure the number and size of respiratory droplets produced from the mouth of healthy individuals during talking and coughing with and without a food dye. The total mass of respiratory droplets was measured using a mask, plastic bag with tissue and an electronic balance with a high precision. Considerable subject variability was observed and the average size of droplets captured using glass slides and microscope was about 50-100 μm. Smaller droplets were also detected by the aerosol spectrometer. More droplets seemed to be generated when a food dye was used. © 2009 The Royal Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://publishing.royalsociety.org/index.cfm?page=1572en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal Society Interfaceen_HK
dc.subjectAirborne infectionen_HK
dc.subjectCoughingen_HK
dc.subjectDropletsen_HK
dc.subjectTalkingen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAerosols-
dc.subject.meshCough - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshMouth Breathing - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshParticle Size-
dc.titleExhaled droplets due to talking and coughingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1742-5689&volume=6 suppl 6&spage=S703&epage=S714&date=2009&atitle=Exhaled+droplets+due+to+talking+and+coughing-
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsif.2009.0388.focusen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19812073-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2843952-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73449083384en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180414en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73449083384&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 6en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS703en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS714en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1742-5662-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271957900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXie, X=14627859000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, H=7404828427en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, L=36065169100en_HK

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