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Article: Effect of urban morphology on wind condition in idealized city models

TitleEffect of urban morphology on wind condition in idealized city models
Authors
KeywordsCity form
Numerical simulation
Urban morphology
Wind conditions
Wind tunnel
Issue Date2009
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenv
Citation
Atmospheric Environment, 2009, v. 43 n. 4, p. 869-878 How to Cite?
AbstractWind conditions in urban environments are important for a number of reasons. They can serve to transport air pollutants out of the urban environment and to moderate urban microclimatic conditions if satisfactory, yet can compromise pedestrian comfort and safety if not. We aim to study experimentally and numerically the effects of urban morphology (e.g., overall city form (skyline), street orientation, and street configuration) on wind conditions in cities. This report considers our initial investigations of two idealized city forms that are coincidentally similar to ancient Roman cities that were organized on one or two primary streets - a main north-south street, the cardus maximus, and a secondary east-west street, the decumanus maximus - and contained within a well-defined perimeter. We first consider round and square city models with one main street set parallel to the approaching wind and a secondary street producing an intersection at city centre. Not surprisingly, wind conditions in the two city models are dissimilar due to their shape differences. We then consider a long rectangular city model with a fully developed steady flow region along the main street. If the main street of the round city model is narrow, the parallel approaching wind cannot blow through the entire street and a penetrating inflow exists at the leeward opening. For the round city model with two crossing streets, a slightly non-parallel wind to the main street generates a stronger wind level in the entire street volume. Crown Copyright © 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124832
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.459
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.999
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR GovernmentHKU 7145/07E
Funding Information:

The work in this Paper is Supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR Government (Project No. HKU 7145/07E). We thank Mr. R. Peltary for his help in building wind tunnel models, Mr. H. Lundstrom and Mr. L. Claesson for hotwire measurement in Our wind tunnel studies. The Valuable comments by Prof. James Axley, School of Architecture; School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University, USA, on the manuscript is also gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSandberg, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:56:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:56:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment, 2009, v. 43 n. 4, p. 869-878en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124832-
dc.description.abstractWind conditions in urban environments are important for a number of reasons. They can serve to transport air pollutants out of the urban environment and to moderate urban microclimatic conditions if satisfactory, yet can compromise pedestrian comfort and safety if not. We aim to study experimentally and numerically the effects of urban morphology (e.g., overall city form (skyline), street orientation, and street configuration) on wind conditions in cities. This report considers our initial investigations of two idealized city forms that are coincidentally similar to ancient Roman cities that were organized on one or two primary streets - a main north-south street, the cardus maximus, and a secondary east-west street, the decumanus maximus - and contained within a well-defined perimeter. We first consider round and square city models with one main street set parallel to the approaching wind and a secondary street producing an intersection at city centre. Not surprisingly, wind conditions in the two city models are dissimilar due to their shape differences. We then consider a long rectangular city model with a fully developed steady flow region along the main street. If the main street of the round city model is narrow, the parallel approaching wind cannot blow through the entire street and a penetrating inflow exists at the leeward opening. For the round city model with two crossing streets, a slightly non-parallel wind to the main street generates a stronger wind level in the entire street volume. Crown Copyright © 2008.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAtmospheric Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectCity formen_HK
dc.subjectNumerical simulationen_HK
dc.subjectUrban morphologyen_HK
dc.subjectWind conditionsen_HK
dc.subjectWind tunnelen_HK
dc.titleEffect of urban morphology on wind condition in idealized city modelsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1352-2310&volume=43&issue=4&spage=869&epage=878&date=2009&atitle=Effect+of+urban+morphology+on+wind+condition+in+idealized+city+modelsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.10.040en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-57949105455en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180520en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-57949105455&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage869en_HK
dc.identifier.epage878en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263188100014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHang, J=35240092500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSandberg, M=35585315900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK

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