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Article: Ventilation strategy and air change rates in idealized high-rise compact urban areas

TitleVentilation strategy and air change rates in idealized high-rise compact urban areas
Authors
KeywordsAir change rate
Flow rate
High-rise building array
Numerical simulation
Turbulence
Issue Date2010
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
Citation
Building And Environment, 2010, v. 45 n. 12, p. 2754-2767 How to Cite?
AbstractWe regarded high-rise compact urban areas as obstacles and pathways to the approaching wind. Flow rates across street openings, open street roofs and along street networks contribute to air exchange between urban airspaces and their external surroundings. We numerically studied the ventilation and air change rates in some aligned square building arrays (the building width B = 30 mm, building heights H = 2B or 2.67B) with building area densities of λp = 0.25 or 0.4 (i.e. the ratio between the plan area of buildings viewed from above and the total underlying surface area). The main and secondary streets are parallel and perpendicular to the approaching wind respectively. Urban parameters are found important to the ventilation. The taller buildings (H = 2.67B) may capture larger inflow rates across windward street openings than the lower (H = 2B). Wider streets and smaller building area density provide more wind pathways and obtain larger flow rates along street networks. Meanwhile, the flow rates along the street may quickly decrease due to strong resistances produced by high-rise buildings, so the total street length should be limited, otherwise the ventilation in downstream regions is not good. The secondary streets always experience worse ventilation than the main streets. A building height variation benefits ventilation in the secondary streets by enhancing vertical mean flow rates across street roofs in contrast to those with uniform heights. If the base of all buildings is open from z = 0 to 0.33B, the ventilation in both the main and secondary streets becomes better. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124823
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.394
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.121
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR GovernmentHKU 7145/07E
Funding Information:

The work in this paper is supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR Government (Project No. HKU 7145/07E). The support from Prof Mats Sandberg in KTH research school, University of Gavle in wind tunnel measurements is also acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:56:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:56:13Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBuilding And Environment, 2010, v. 45 n. 12, p. 2754-2767en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124823-
dc.description.abstractWe regarded high-rise compact urban areas as obstacles and pathways to the approaching wind. Flow rates across street openings, open street roofs and along street networks contribute to air exchange between urban airspaces and their external surroundings. We numerically studied the ventilation and air change rates in some aligned square building arrays (the building width B = 30 mm, building heights H = 2B or 2.67B) with building area densities of λp = 0.25 or 0.4 (i.e. the ratio between the plan area of buildings viewed from above and the total underlying surface area). The main and secondary streets are parallel and perpendicular to the approaching wind respectively. Urban parameters are found important to the ventilation. The taller buildings (H = 2.67B) may capture larger inflow rates across windward street openings than the lower (H = 2B). Wider streets and smaller building area density provide more wind pathways and obtain larger flow rates along street networks. Meanwhile, the flow rates along the street may quickly decrease due to strong resistances produced by high-rise buildings, so the total street length should be limited, otherwise the ventilation in downstream regions is not good. The secondary streets always experience worse ventilation than the main streets. A building height variation benefits ventilation in the secondary streets by enhancing vertical mean flow rates across street roofs in contrast to those with uniform heights. If the base of all buildings is open from z = 0 to 0.33B, the ventilation in both the main and secondary streets becomes better. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectAir change rateen_HK
dc.subjectFlow rateen_HK
dc.subjectHigh-rise building arrayen_HK
dc.subjectNumerical simulationen_HK
dc.subjectTurbulenceen_HK
dc.titleVentilation strategy and air change rates in idealized high-rise compact urban areasen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0360-1323&volume=45&issue=12&spage=2754&epage=2767&date=2010&atitle=Ventilation+strategy+and+air+change+rates+in+idealized+high-rise+compact+urban+areasen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.buildenv.2010.06.004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955427053en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180508en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955427053&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume45en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2754en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2767en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281326800016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHang, J=35240092500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7396967-

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