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Article: High Earth-system climate sensitivity determined from Pliocene carbon dioxide concentrations

TitleHigh Earth-system climate sensitivity determined from Pliocene carbon dioxide concentrations
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Nature Geoscience, 2010, v. 3 n. 1, p. 27-30 How to Cite?
AbstractClimate sensitivitythe mean global temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations through radiative forcing and associated feedbacksis estimated at 1.5-4.5 C (ref.1). However, this value incorporates only relatively rapid feedbacks such as changes in atmospheric water vapour concentrations, and the distributions of sea ice, clouds and aerosols. Earth-system climate sensitivity, by contrast, additionally includes the effects of long-term feedbacks such as changes in continental ice-sheet extent, terrestrial ecosystems and the production of greenhouse gases other than CO 2. Here we reconstruct atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations for the early and middle Pliocene, when temperatures were about 3-4 C warmer than preindustrial values, to estimate Earth-system climate sensitivity from a fully equilibrated state of the planet. We demonstrate that only a relatively small rise in atmospheric CO 2 levels was associated with substantial global warming about 4.5 million years ago, and that CO 2 levels at peak temperatures were between about 365 and 415 ppm. We conclude that the Earth-system climate sensitivity has been significantly higher over the past five million years than estimated from fast feedbacks alone. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124645
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 12.508
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.297
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Science FoundationOCE-0727306
Yale Climate and Energy Institute
Funding Information:

This work was funded by National Science Foundation grant OCE-0727306 and supported by the Yale Climate and Energy Institute. Conversations with K. Caldeira and R. DeConto were helpful and greatly appreciated.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPagani, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLariviere, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRavelo, ACen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:46:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:46:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNature Geoscience, 2010, v. 3 n. 1, p. 27-30en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1752-0894en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124645-
dc.description.abstractClimate sensitivitythe mean global temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations through radiative forcing and associated feedbacksis estimated at 1.5-4.5 C (ref.1). However, this value incorporates only relatively rapid feedbacks such as changes in atmospheric water vapour concentrations, and the distributions of sea ice, clouds and aerosols. Earth-system climate sensitivity, by contrast, additionally includes the effects of long-term feedbacks such as changes in continental ice-sheet extent, terrestrial ecosystems and the production of greenhouse gases other than CO 2. Here we reconstruct atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations for the early and middle Pliocene, when temperatures were about 3-4 C warmer than preindustrial values, to estimate Earth-system climate sensitivity from a fully equilibrated state of the planet. We demonstrate that only a relatively small rise in atmospheric CO 2 levels was associated with substantial global warming about 4.5 million years ago, and that CO 2 levels at peak temperatures were between about 365 and 415 ppm. We conclude that the Earth-system climate sensitivity has been significantly higher over the past five million years than estimated from fast feedbacks alone. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNature Geoscienceen_HK
dc.titleHigh Earth-system climate sensitivity determined from Pliocene carbon dioxide concentrationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1752-0894&volume=3&spage=27&epage=30&date=2010&atitle=High+Earth-system+climate+sensitivity+determined+from+Pliocene+carbon+dioxide+concentrationsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiu, Z:zhliu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, Z=rp00750en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ngeo724en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73449133402en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175747en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73449133402&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage27en_HK
dc.identifier.epage30en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1752-0908-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272976200012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPagani, M=7101857920en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Z=16177844800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLariviere, J=26425102400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRavelo, AC=7006765934en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6416339-

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