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Article: Class 1 integronase gene and tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetC in different water environments of Jiangsu Province, China

TitleClass 1 integronase gene and tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetC in different water environments of Jiangsu Province, China
Authors
KeywordsAntibiotic resistance gene
Tetracycline
Integron
Water environment
Drinking water
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0963-9292
Citation
Ecotoxicology, 2009, v. 18 n. 6, p. 652-660 How to Cite?
AbstractClass 1 integronase gene (intI1) and tetracycline resistance genes (tetA and tetC) from various environmental sites in Jiangsu Province (China) were detected using qualitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and quantified with SYBR Green-based qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR) in this study. Qualitative PCR assays demonstrated that intI1, tetA and tetC occurred in the water environments of Taihu Lake, the Nanjing section of the Yangtze River, a sewage treatment plant (STP) in Nanjing City, and two drinking water treating bioreactors. qRT-PCR results showed that abundance of intI1 in lake water and sediments was lower than the tet genes, for a given sample site and date (P < 0.05). On a volumetric basis, lake sediments contained higher concentrations of the three genes by four to five orders of magnitude than water samples, and lake water and sediments sampled in April contained fewer copies of all the genes than the samples collected in June and August (P < 0.05). The levels of intI1, tetA and tetC in the Yangtze River water increased significantly after the river flowed through Nanjing City (P < 0.05). 94.1% integron, 97.2% tetA and 98.3% tetC were removed by the activated sludge process in the STP, and more than 80% of each gene was removed in both of the two biofilters in terms of relative concentration based on sample volume. However, on the basis of DNA mass, lower removals were obtained for both the activated sludge and biofiltration processes. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124583
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.329
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.108
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorFang, HHPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFord, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:42:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:42:35Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEcotoxicology, 2009, v. 18 n. 6, p. 652-660en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0963-9292en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124583-
dc.description.abstractClass 1 integronase gene (intI1) and tetracycline resistance genes (tetA and tetC) from various environmental sites in Jiangsu Province (China) were detected using qualitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and quantified with SYBR Green-based qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR) in this study. Qualitative PCR assays demonstrated that intI1, tetA and tetC occurred in the water environments of Taihu Lake, the Nanjing section of the Yangtze River, a sewage treatment plant (STP) in Nanjing City, and two drinking water treating bioreactors. qRT-PCR results showed that abundance of intI1 in lake water and sediments was lower than the tet genes, for a given sample site and date (P < 0.05). On a volumetric basis, lake sediments contained higher concentrations of the three genes by four to five orders of magnitude than water samples, and lake water and sediments sampled in April contained fewer copies of all the genes than the samples collected in June and August (P < 0.05). The levels of intI1, tetA and tetC in the Yangtze River water increased significantly after the river flowed through Nanjing City (P < 0.05). 94.1% integron, 97.2% tetA and 98.3% tetC were removed by the activated sludge process in the STP, and more than 80% of each gene was removed in both of the two biofilters in terms of relative concentration based on sample volume. However, on the basis of DNA mass, lower removals were obtained for both the activated sludge and biofiltration processes. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0963-9292en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEcotoxicologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectAntibiotic resistance gene-
dc.subjectTetracycline-
dc.subjectIntegron-
dc.subjectWater environment-
dc.subjectDrinking water-
dc.subject.meshAntiporters - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacterial Proteins - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA, Bacterial - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoringen_HK
dc.subject.meshFresh Water - analysis - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenes, Bacterialen_HK
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - analysis - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshIntegrases - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRepressor Proteins - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reactionen_HK
dc.subject.meshSewage - analysis - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTetracycline Resistance - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshWater Purificationen_HK
dc.titleClass 1 integronase gene and tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetC in different water environments of Jiangsu Province, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0963-9292&volume=18&issue=6&spage=652&epage=660&date=2009&atitle=Class+1+integronase+gene+and+tetracycline+resistance+genes+tetA+and+tetC+in+different+water+environments+of+Jiangsu+Province,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T:zhangt@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFang, HHP:hrechef@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFang, HHP=rp00115en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10646-009-0332-3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19495963-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651097650en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175520en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67651097650&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage652en_HK
dc.identifier.epage660en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267669500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, X=8555121100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, B=7403584877en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=13104717100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, T=24470677400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=35723344100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, HHP=7402542625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFord, T=26634948200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, S=18039405400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4784417-

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