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Article: An fMRI Study Showing the Effect of Acupuncture in Chronic Stage Stroke Patients With Aphasia

TitleAn fMRI Study Showing the Effect of Acupuncture in Chronic Stage Stroke Patients With Aphasia
Authors
Keywordsacupuncture
aphasia
chronic stroke
fMRI
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Korea LLC. Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://journalams.com/00_Main.html
Citation
Jams Journal Of Acupuncture And Meridian Studies, 2010, v. 3 n. 1, p. 53-57 How to Cite?
AbstractAcupuncture is used as a treatment in stroke patients with aphasia, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. This study aims to examine the relationship between changes in language function and brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging in chronic stroke patients with aphasia who underwent an 8-week acupuncture protocol. Seven chronic stroke patients were identified from a stroke database of a regional acute hospital in Hong Kong between January and July 2007. Patients were treated three times a week over a period of 8 weeks. Four acupoints were stimulated on the weak side of the patient's body. No other rehabilitation was given during the study period. Changes in language function were measured by aphasia quotient (AQ) of Cantonese Aphasia Battery (CAB). Functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level dependent signals were used to demonstrate the correlation between changes in AQ and brain activation after treatment. The patients were divided into well-recovered and poorly- recovered groups based on their CAB scores at entry. The well-recovered group showed significant improvement in CAB scores after receiving acupuncture treatment. A significant correlation between changes in AQ and blood oxygen level dependent activation in the lesioned Wernicke's speech area was found. These preliminary results suggest that acupuncture may be beneficial to language recovery in chronic stroke patients. © 2010 Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124449
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.383
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, ACMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFai Cheung, RTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAuYeung, PKMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, LSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:34:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:34:58Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJams Journal Of Acupuncture And Meridian Studies, 2010, v. 3 n. 1, p. 53-57en_HK
dc.identifier.issn2005-2901en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124449-
dc.description.abstractAcupuncture is used as a treatment in stroke patients with aphasia, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. This study aims to examine the relationship between changes in language function and brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging in chronic stroke patients with aphasia who underwent an 8-week acupuncture protocol. Seven chronic stroke patients were identified from a stroke database of a regional acute hospital in Hong Kong between January and July 2007. Patients were treated three times a week over a period of 8 weeks. Four acupoints were stimulated on the weak side of the patient's body. No other rehabilitation was given during the study period. Changes in language function were measured by aphasia quotient (AQ) of Cantonese Aphasia Battery (CAB). Functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level dependent signals were used to demonstrate the correlation between changes in AQ and brain activation after treatment. The patients were divided into well-recovered and poorly- recovered groups based on their CAB scores at entry. The well-recovered group showed significant improvement in CAB scores after receiving acupuncture treatment. A significant correlation between changes in AQ and blood oxygen level dependent activation in the lesioned Wernicke's speech area was found. These preliminary results suggest that acupuncture may be beneficial to language recovery in chronic stroke patients. © 2010 Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Korea LLC. Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://journalams.com/00_Main.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJAMS Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studiesen_HK
dc.subjectacupunctureen_HK
dc.subjectaphasiaen_HK
dc.subjectchronic strokeen_HK
dc.subjectfMRIen_HK
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Points-
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy-
dc.subject.meshAphasia - etiology - psychology - radiography - therapy-
dc.subject.meshLanguage Tests-
dc.subject.meshStroke - complications - psychology - radiography - therapy-
dc.titleAn fMRI Study Showing the Effect of Acupuncture in Chronic Stage Stroke Patients With Aphasiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=2005-2901&volume=3&issue=1&spage=53&epage=57&date=2010&atitle=An+fMRI+study+showing+the+effect+of+acupuncture+in+chronic+stage+stroke+patients+with+aphasia-
dc.identifier.emailChau, ACM:ansonc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFai Cheung, RT:rtcheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, ACM=rp00044en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFai Cheung, RT=rp00434en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S2005-2901(10)60009-Xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20633517-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950354427en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174221en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950354427&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage53en_HK
dc.identifier.epage57en_HK
dc.publisher.placeKorea, Republic ofen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, ACM=9633648600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFai Cheung, RT=7202397498en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, X=36097997500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAuYeung, PKM=6602956911en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, LSW=7501450364en_HK

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