File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Willingness to pay for implant therapy: A study of patient preference

TitleWillingness to pay for implant therapy: A study of patient preference
Authors
KeywordsDental implants
Missing teeth
Patient preference
Willingness to pay
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2010, v. 21 n. 8, p. 789-793 How to Cite?
Abstract
Aims: This study determined the amount of willingness to pay (WTP) for implant treatment and identified the factors affecting WTP. Methods: Subjects attending a university dental hospital were recruited (n=59). They were presented with two hypothetical clinical scenarios: missing one anterior/posterior tooth. The clinical procedures, outcome and plausible complications of various replacement options (fixed and removable partial dentures, implants) and sequelae of no treatment were presented. They were then asked how much they were willing to pay for tooth replacement under the two situations using a bidding method, with a starting bid of Hong Kong (HK)$20,000 in HK$1000 increment/decrement if they were willing/unwilling to pay that amount (1 USD=7.8 HKD). The amount was recorded at which the subject chose the opposite option or it reached HK$0. Demographic data were also collected. WTP values were compared between anterior and posterior replacements, and among various demographic subgroups. Spearman's correlations and linear regression analysis were also conducted. Results: Ninety-four percent and 84% of the subjects chose implant treatment to replace missing anterior and posterior teeth, respectively. The mean WTP amounts for anterior/posterior tooth replacement were HK$11,000/HK$10,000 (P>0.05). Higher WTP amounts were obtained from females, subjects without missing teeth or restorative need, and had attained higher level of education (P<0.05). Gender (P<0.05), level of education (P=0.042), and the presence of missing teeth (P=0.001) were independent predictors of WTP. Conclusions: The estimated WTP value for a single tooth replacement using dental implants was HK$10,000. Gender, level of education and presence of missing teeth were independent predictors that influenced WTP. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124429
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.123
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was supported by a research grant of the University of Hong Kong.

References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:33:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:33:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 2010, v. 21 n. 8, p. 789-793en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124429-
dc.description.abstractAims: This study determined the amount of willingness to pay (WTP) for implant treatment and identified the factors affecting WTP. Methods: Subjects attending a university dental hospital were recruited (n=59). They were presented with two hypothetical clinical scenarios: missing one anterior/posterior tooth. The clinical procedures, outcome and plausible complications of various replacement options (fixed and removable partial dentures, implants) and sequelae of no treatment were presented. They were then asked how much they were willing to pay for tooth replacement under the two situations using a bidding method, with a starting bid of Hong Kong (HK)$20,000 in HK$1000 increment/decrement if they were willing/unwilling to pay that amount (1 USD=7.8 HKD). The amount was recorded at which the subject chose the opposite option or it reached HK$0. Demographic data were also collected. WTP values were compared between anterior and posterior replacements, and among various demographic subgroups. Spearman's correlations and linear regression analysis were also conducted. Results: Ninety-four percent and 84% of the subjects chose implant treatment to replace missing anterior and posterior teeth, respectively. The mean WTP amounts for anterior/posterior tooth replacement were HK$11,000/HK$10,000 (P>0.05). Higher WTP amounts were obtained from females, subjects without missing teeth or restorative need, and had attained higher level of education (P<0.05). Gender (P<0.05), level of education (P=0.042), and the presence of missing teeth (P=0.001) were independent predictors of WTP. Conclusions: The estimated WTP value for a single tooth replacement using dental implants was HK$10,000. Gender, level of education and presence of missing teeth were independent predictors that influenced WTP. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Implants Researchen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectDental implantsen_HK
dc.subjectMissing teethen_HK
dc.subjectPatient preferenceen_HK
dc.subjectWillingness to payen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Implants, Single-Tooth - economics-
dc.subject.meshFinancing, Personal-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong-
dc.subject.meshJaw, Edentulous, Partially - rehabilitation-
dc.subject.meshPatient Preference-
dc.titleWillingness to pay for implant therapy: A study of patient preferenceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0905-7161&volume=21&issue=8&spage=789&epage=793&date=2010&atitle=Willingness+to+pay+for+implant+therapy:+a+study+of+patient+preferenceen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KCM:kcmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ:mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KCM=rp00032en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0501.2009.01897.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20384702en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955168457en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros173911en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955168457&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage789en_HK
dc.identifier.epage793en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0501-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279651200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KCM=26221830300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGrath, CPJ=7102335507en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7493438-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats