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Article: Dietary behavior and knowledge of dental erosion among Chinese adults

TitleDietary behavior and knowledge of dental erosion among Chinese adults
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcoralhealth/
Citation
Bmc Oral Health, 2010, v. 10 n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To study the dietary behavior and knowledge about dental erosion and self-reported symptoms that can be related to dental erosion among Chinese adults in Hong Kong.Methods: Chinese adults aged 25-45 years were randomly selected from a list of registered telephone numbers generated by computer. A telephone survey was administered to obtain information on demographic characteristics, dietary habits, dental visits, and knowledge of and presence of self-reported symptoms that can be related to dental erosion.Results: A total of 520 participants were interviewed (response rate, 75%; sampling error, ± 4.4%) and their mean age was 37. Most respondents (79%) had ever had caries, and about two thirds (64%) attended dental check-ups at least once a year. Respondents had a mean of 5.4 meals per day and 36% had at least 6 meals per day. Fruit (89%) and lemon tea/water (41%) were the most commonly consumed acidic food and beverage. When asked if they ever noticed changes in their teeth, most respondents (92%) said they had experienced change that can be related to erosion. However, many (71%) had never heard about dental erosion and 53% mixed up dental erosion with dental caries.Conclusion: Hong Kong Chinese adults have frequent intake of food and many have experienced symptoms that can be related to dental erosion. Their level of awareness of and knowledge about dental erosion is generally low, despite most of them have regular dental check-ups. Dental health education is essential to help the public understand dental erosion and its damaging effects. © 2010 Chu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124423
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.21
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.616
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, CHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPang, KKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:33:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:33:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Oral Health, 2010, v. 10 n. 1en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1472-6831en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124423-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To study the dietary behavior and knowledge about dental erosion and self-reported symptoms that can be related to dental erosion among Chinese adults in Hong Kong.Methods: Chinese adults aged 25-45 years were randomly selected from a list of registered telephone numbers generated by computer. A telephone survey was administered to obtain information on demographic characteristics, dietary habits, dental visits, and knowledge of and presence of self-reported symptoms that can be related to dental erosion.Results: A total of 520 participants were interviewed (response rate, 75%; sampling error, ± 4.4%) and their mean age was 37. Most respondents (79%) had ever had caries, and about two thirds (64%) attended dental check-ups at least once a year. Respondents had a mean of 5.4 meals per day and 36% had at least 6 meals per day. Fruit (89%) and lemon tea/water (41%) were the most commonly consumed acidic food and beverage. When asked if they ever noticed changes in their teeth, most respondents (92%) said they had experienced change that can be related to erosion. However, many (71%) had never heard about dental erosion and 53% mixed up dental erosion with dental caries.Conclusion: Hong Kong Chinese adults have frequent intake of food and many have experienced symptoms that can be related to dental erosion. Their level of awareness of and knowledge about dental erosion is generally low, despite most of them have regular dental check-ups. Dental health education is essential to help the public understand dental erosion and its damaging effects. © 2010 Chu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcoralhealth/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Oral Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsB M C Oral Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd..-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshFood Habits-
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavior - ethnology-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshTooth Erosion - diagnosis - prevention and control - psychology-
dc.titleDietary behavior and knowledge of dental erosion among Chinese adultsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1472-6831&volume=10&issue=13&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Dietary+behavior+and+knowledge+of+dental+erosion+among+Chinese+adults-
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH:chchu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM:hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6831-10-13en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20525244-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2894740-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954309280en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174421en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954309280&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208596700013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, CH=7404345729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, KKL=36159760600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, ECM=7101705982en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7240423-

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