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Article: Executive function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea treated with continuous positive airway pressure

TitleExecutive function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea treated with continuous positive airway pressure
Authors
KeywordsCPAP treatment
Executive function
Hypoxemia
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome
Working memory
Issue Date2010
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INS
Citation
Journal Of The International Neuropsychological Society, 2010, v. 16 n. 6, p. 1077-1088 How to Cite?
AbstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by disrupted breathing and hypoxemia during sleep, daytime sleepiness, and changes in cognition and mood. One important question is regarding the reversibility of cognitive deficits after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Here, we report the outcomes of CPAP treatment as measured by tests of attention and executive function. Thirty-seven individuals with moderate to severe OSA and compliant on CPAP treatment were studied with working memory tasks, neuropsychological testing, and overnight polysomnographic sleep study and compared to 27 healthy controls. CPAP improved the respiratory disturbance index, minimum and mean oxygen saturation (SpO2), subjective sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness ratings compared to pre-treatment values. In terms of current neurocognitive function, treated individuals with OSA performed at a comparable level to controls on basic working memory storage functions but still showed a significant reduction on tests of working memory requiring the central executive. The OSA group also performed worse on neuropsychological measures of complex attention, executive function, and psychomotor speed. While CPAP is an effective treatment for OSA in terms of ameliorating breathing disruption and oxygen desaturation during sleep, as well as daytime sleepiness, some cognitive deficits may be more resistant to treatment. (JINS, 2010, 16, 1077-1088.) Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124319
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.633
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.348
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
Funding Information:

This study was funded by a Health Research Project Grant from the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation These data form part of a doctoral thesis submitted by E L, we are grateful to Drs Ben Rusak, Ray Klein and Penny Corkum for their comments on the original thesis Our sincere gratitude goes to Dr Sergio Della Sala for his generosity in sharing the test materials of the dual task that he and his colleagues developed We appreciate the assistance of Dr Beverly Butler with neuropsychological testing of Dr John

References
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEskes, GAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, DLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRajda, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpurr, KFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:27:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:27:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The International Neuropsychological Society, 2010, v. 16 n. 6, p. 1077-1088en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124319-
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by disrupted breathing and hypoxemia during sleep, daytime sleepiness, and changes in cognition and mood. One important question is regarding the reversibility of cognitive deficits after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Here, we report the outcomes of CPAP treatment as measured by tests of attention and executive function. Thirty-seven individuals with moderate to severe OSA and compliant on CPAP treatment were studied with working memory tasks, neuropsychological testing, and overnight polysomnographic sleep study and compared to 27 healthy controls. CPAP improved the respiratory disturbance index, minimum and mean oxygen saturation (SpO2), subjective sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness ratings compared to pre-treatment values. In terms of current neurocognitive function, treated individuals with OSA performed at a comparable level to controls on basic working memory storage functions but still showed a significant reduction on tests of working memory requiring the central executive. The OSA group also performed worse on neuropsychological measures of complex attention, executive function, and psychomotor speed. While CPAP is an effective treatment for OSA in terms of ameliorating breathing disruption and oxygen desaturation during sleep, as well as daytime sleepiness, some cognitive deficits may be more resistant to treatment. (JINS, 2010, 16, 1077-1088.) Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the International Neuropsychological Societyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCPAP treatmenten_HK
dc.subjectExecutive functionen_HK
dc.subjectHypoxemiaen_HK
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apnea syndromeen_HK
dc.subjectWorking memoryen_HK
dc.titleExecutive function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea treated with continuous positive airway pressureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1355-6177&volume=16&spage=1077&epage=1088&date=2010&atitle=Executive+function+in+patients+with+obstructive+sleep+apnea+treated+with+continuous+positive+airway+pressureen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY:eyylau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1355617710000901en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20735887-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79451474589en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193165en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79451474589&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1077en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1088en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7661-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285023200015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1017/S1355617711000269-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, EYY=36448882600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEskes, GA=6701737958en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorrison, DL=7402118739en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRajda, M=6603235764en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpurr, KF=23480229900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7963609-

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