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Article: Position of phonetic components may influence how written words are processed in the brain: Evidence from Chinese phonetic compound pronunciation

TitlePosition of phonetic components may influence how written words are processed in the brain: Evidence from Chinese phonetic compound pronunciation
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPsychonomic Society, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://psychonomic.org/CABN/
Citation
Cognitive, Affective And Behavioral Neuroscience, 2010, v. 10 n. 4, p. 552-559 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies have shown a right-visual-field (RVF)/left-hemisphere (LH) advantage in Chinese phonetic compound pronunciation. Here, we contrast the processing of two phonetic compound types: a dominant structure in which a semantic component appears on the left and a phonetic component on the right (SP characters), and a minority structure with the opposite arrangement (PS characters). We show that this RVF/LH advantage was observed only in SP character pronunciation, but not in PS character pronunciation. This result suggests that SP character processing is more LH lateralized than is PS character processing and is consistent with corresponding ERP N170 data. This effect may be due to the dominance of SP characters in the lexicon, which makes readers opt to obtain phonological information from the right of the characters. This study thus shows that the overall information distribution of word components in the lexicon may influence how written words are processed in the brain. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://cabn.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124311
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.886
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.884
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
HKU10400471
Research Grant Council of Hong KongHKU 744509H
Funding Information:

We are grateful to the HKU Seed Funding Program for Basic Research (Project 10400471 to J.H.H.) and the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong (Project HKU 744509H to J.H.H.). We thank the editor and three anonymous reviewers for helpful comments. Correspondence should be addressed to J. H. Hsiao, Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, 604 Knowles Building, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (e-mail: jhsiao@hku.hk or kanalty@gmail.com).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T10:27:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T10:27:21Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCognitive, Affective And Behavioral Neuroscience, 2010, v. 10 n. 4, p. 552-559en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1530-7026en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124311-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies have shown a right-visual-field (RVF)/left-hemisphere (LH) advantage in Chinese phonetic compound pronunciation. Here, we contrast the processing of two phonetic compound types: a dominant structure in which a semantic component appears on the left and a phonetic component on the right (SP characters), and a minority structure with the opposite arrangement (PS characters). We show that this RVF/LH advantage was observed only in SP character pronunciation, but not in PS character pronunciation. This result suggests that SP character processing is more LH lateralized than is PS character processing and is consistent with corresponding ERP N170 data. This effect may be due to the dominance of SP characters in the lexicon, which makes readers opt to obtain phonological information from the right of the characters. This study thus shows that the overall information distribution of word components in the lexicon may influence how written words are processed in the brain. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://cabn.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychonomic Society, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://psychonomic.org/CABN/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscienceen_HK
dc.rightsThis manuscript was accepted for publication in [Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience] on [2010]. The copyright is held by Psychonomic Society Publications. This document may not exactly correspond to the final published version. Psychonomic Society Publications disclaims any responsibility or liability for errors in this manuscript.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology-
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPhonetics-
dc.subject.meshVisual Fields - physiology-
dc.titlePosition of phonetic components may influence how written words are processed in the brain: Evidence from Chinese phonetic compound pronunciationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1530-7026&volume=10&issue=4&spage=552&epage=559&date=2010&atitle=Position+of+phonetic+components+may+influence+how+written+words+are+processed+in+the+brain:+evidence+from+Chinese+phonetic+compound+pronunciation-
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JH:jhsiao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JH=rp00632en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/CABN.10.4.552en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21098814-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79751519704en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175495en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79751519704&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage552en_HK
dc.identifier.epage559en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1531-135X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285439000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectThe two sides of cognition: Hemispheric processing of face and word recognition-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, JH=7101605473en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, T=35315812700en_HK

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