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Article: Factors controlling the distribution of archaeal tetraethers in terrestrial hot springs

TitleFactors controlling the distribution of archaeal tetraethers in terrestrial hot springs
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Applied And Environmental Microbiology, 2008, v. 74 n. 11, p. 3523-3532 How to Cite?
AbstractGlycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) found in hot springs reflect the abundance and community structure of Archaea in these extreme environments. The relationships between GDGTs, archaeal communities, and physical or geochemical variables are underexamined to date and when reported often result in conflicting interpretations. Here, we examined profiles of GDGTs from pure cultures of Crenarchaeota and from terrestrial geothermal springs representing a wide distribution of locations, including Yellowstone National Park (United States), the Great Basin of Nevada and California (United States), Kamchatka (Russia), Tengchong thermal field (China), and Thailand. These samples had temperatures of 36.5 to 87°C and pH values of 3.0 to 9.2. GDGT abundances also were determined for three soil samples adjacent to some of the hot springs. Principal component analysis identified four factors that accounted for most of the variance among nine individual GDGTs, temperature, and pH. Significant correlations were observed between pH and the GDGTs crenarchaeol and GDGT-4 (four cyclopentane rings, m/z 1,294); pH correlated positively with crenarchaeol and inversely with GDGT-4. Weaker correlations were observed between temperature and the four factors. Three of the four GDGTs used in the marine TEX86 paleotemperature index (GDGT-1 to -3, but not crenarchaeol isomer) were associated with a single factor. No correlation was observed for GDGT-O (acyclic caldarchaeol): it is effectively its own variable. The biosynthetic mechanisms and exact archaeal community structures leading to these relationships remain unknown. However, the data in general show promise for the continued development of GDGT lipid-based physiochemical proxies for archaeal evolution and for paleo-ecology or paleoclimate studies. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124161
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.823
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.891
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPi, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorInskeep, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPerevalova, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRomanek, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, CLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-28T08:33:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-28T08:33:28Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationApplied And Environmental Microbiology, 2008, v. 74 n. 11, p. 3523-3532en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124161-
dc.description.abstractGlycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) found in hot springs reflect the abundance and community structure of Archaea in these extreme environments. The relationships between GDGTs, archaeal communities, and physical or geochemical variables are underexamined to date and when reported often result in conflicting interpretations. Here, we examined profiles of GDGTs from pure cultures of Crenarchaeota and from terrestrial geothermal springs representing a wide distribution of locations, including Yellowstone National Park (United States), the Great Basin of Nevada and California (United States), Kamchatka (Russia), Tengchong thermal field (China), and Thailand. These samples had temperatures of 36.5 to 87°C and pH values of 3.0 to 9.2. GDGT abundances also were determined for three soil samples adjacent to some of the hot springs. Principal component analysis identified four factors that accounted for most of the variance among nine individual GDGTs, temperature, and pH. Significant correlations were observed between pH and the GDGTs crenarchaeol and GDGT-4 (four cyclopentane rings, m/z 1,294); pH correlated positively with crenarchaeol and inversely with GDGT-4. Weaker correlations were observed between temperature and the four factors. Three of the four GDGTs used in the marine TEX86 paleotemperature index (GDGT-1 to -3, but not crenarchaeol isomer) were associated with a single factor. No correlation was observed for GDGT-O (acyclic caldarchaeol): it is effectively its own variable. The biosynthetic mechanisms and exact archaeal community structures leading to these relationships remain unknown. However, the data in general show promise for the continued development of GDGT lipid-based physiochemical proxies for archaeal evolution and for paleo-ecology or paleoclimate studies. Copyright © 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.-
dc.relation.ispartofApplied and Environmental Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsApplied and Environmental Microbiology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.-
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, [insert journal name, volume number, page numbers, and year]-
dc.subject.meshChina-
dc.subject.meshCrenarchaeota - chemistry - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshGlyceryl Ethers - analysis-
dc.subject.meshHot Springs - chemistry - microbiology-
dc.subject.meshSoil - analysis-
dc.titleFactors controlling the distribution of archaeal tetraethers in terrestrial hot springsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0099-2240&volume=74&spage=3523&epage=3532&date=2008&atitle=Factors+controlling+the+distribution+of+archaeal+tetraethers+in+terrestrial+hot+springs-
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp01354en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.02450-07en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18390673-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2423032-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44949100503en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros166838-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44949100503&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume74en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3523en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3532en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256460400024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPearson, A=7401994256en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPi, Y=22938862400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, W=7403942900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, W=23668145100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=27171876700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridInskeep, W=7005644647en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerevalova, A=6506778817en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRomanek, C=6603780398en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, S=23983105000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, CL=7405489900en_HK

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