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Article: Bicycle use for transport in an Australian and a Belgian city: Associations with built-environment attributes

TitleBicycle use for transport in an Australian and a Belgian city: Associations with built-environment attributes
Authors
KeywordsCycling
Neighborhood walkability
Physical activity
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC.
Citation
Journal Of Urban Health, 2010, v. 87 n. 2, p. 189-198 How to Cite?
AbstractThe walkability attributes of neighborhood environments (residential density, land use mixture, and connectedness of streets) have been found to be associated with higher rates of walking. However, relatively less is known about the associations of walkability attributes with bicycle use for transport. We examined the relationships between adults' bicycle use for transport and measures of neighborhood walkability in two settings: an Australian city (Adelaide) with low rates of bicycle use and a Belgian city (Ghent) with high rates of bicycle use. A total of 2,159 and 382 participants were recruited in Adelaide and Ghent, respectively. A walkability index was derived from objectively measured data in Adelaide, while a similar index was derived from perceived measures in Ghent. Logistic regression models were employed to examine associations of bicycle use with different levels of walkability. There were higher rates of bicycle ownership for Ghent compared to Adelaide participants (96% versus 61%), and there was a higher prevalence of bicycle use for transport for Ghent compared to Adelaide participants (50% vs. 14%). Despite the large differences in bicycle ownership and use, living in a high-walkable neighborhood was associated with significantly higher odds of bicycle use for transport in both cities, after adjusting for relevant confounding factors. Built-environment innovations that are increasingly being advocated by health authorities and transport planners, primarily to promote higher rates ofwalking for transport, should also impact positively on bicycle use. © 2010 The New York Academy of Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124057
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.046
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.244
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)213114
NHMRC301200
252799
Physical Activity in Localities and Community Environments (PLACE)
NHMRC Public Health Fellowship301261
Funding Information:

For the Adelaide study, we thank the South Australian Government Department for Transport and Urban Planning for providing access to the relevant GIS data. The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Grant # 213114 and NHMRC Program Grant # 301200 supported the Physical Activity in Localities and Community Environments (PLACE) study. Sugiyama is supported by a Capacity Building Grant in PopulationHealth (# 252799) from the NHMRC. Leslie is supported by an NHMRC Public Health Fellowship (# 301261). For the Ghent study, we thank the Ghent University for the grant support for Van Dyck. We also thank Professors Graeme Hugo, James F. Sallis, Lawrence Frank, and Neil Coffee for their conceptual, methodological, and practical contributions.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorSugiyama, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorDyck, DVen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBauman, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-19T04:36:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-19T04:36:44Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Urban Health, 2010, v. 87 n. 2, p. 189-198en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124057-
dc.description.abstractThe walkability attributes of neighborhood environments (residential density, land use mixture, and connectedness of streets) have been found to be associated with higher rates of walking. However, relatively less is known about the associations of walkability attributes with bicycle use for transport. We examined the relationships between adults' bicycle use for transport and measures of neighborhood walkability in two settings: an Australian city (Adelaide) with low rates of bicycle use and a Belgian city (Ghent) with high rates of bicycle use. A total of 2,159 and 382 participants were recruited in Adelaide and Ghent, respectively. A walkability index was derived from objectively measured data in Adelaide, while a similar index was derived from perceived measures in Ghent. Logistic regression models were employed to examine associations of bicycle use with different levels of walkability. There were higher rates of bicycle ownership for Ghent compared to Adelaide participants (96% versus 61%), and there was a higher prevalence of bicycle use for transport for Ghent compared to Adelaide participants (50% vs. 14%). Despite the large differences in bicycle ownership and use, living in a high-walkable neighborhood was associated with significantly higher odds of bicycle use for transport in both cities, after adjusting for relevant confounding factors. Built-environment innovations that are increasingly being advocated by health authorities and transport planners, primarily to promote higher rates ofwalking for transport, should also impact positively on bicycle use. © 2010 The New York Academy of Medicine.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Healthen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_HK
dc.subjectCyclingen_HK
dc.subjectNeighborhood walkabilityen_HK
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBicycling-
dc.subject.meshEnvironment Design-
dc.subject.meshUrban Population-
dc.titleBicycle use for transport in an Australian and a Belgian city: Associations with built-environment attributesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1099-3460&volume=87&issue=2&spage=189&epage=198&date=2010&atitle=Bicycle+use+for+transport+in+an+Australian+and+a+Belgian+city:+Associations+with+built-environment+attributes-
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11524-009-9424-xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20174879-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2845830-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953672175en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174640-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953672175&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume87en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage189en_HK
dc.identifier.epage198en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276062100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 01 Dec 2010-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Bourdeaudhuij, I=35510873600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSugiyama, T=18438631200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeslie, E=7004928143en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDyck, DV=36193756500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBauman, A=25421265100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6830161-

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