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Article: Is childhood meat eating associated with better later adulthood cognition in a developing population?

TitleIs childhood meat eating associated with better later adulthood cognition in a developing population?
Authors
KeywordsAged
Childhood
China
Cognition
Cross-sectional studies
Dementia
Nutrition
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0393-2990
Citation
European Journal Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 25 n. 7, p. 507-516 How to Cite?
AbstractInadequate childhood nutrition is associated with poor short-term academic and cognitive outcomes. Dietary supplementation with meat is associated with better cognitive outcome in children. Whether childhood nutrition has life long effects on cognitive function is unclear. We examined the association of childhood meat eating with adulthood cognitive function in southern China where the older population lived through significant hardship during their early years. Multivariable linear regression was used in a cross-sectional study of 20,086 Chinese men and women aged iobank Cohort Study (phases 2 and 3) 2005-8. We assessed the association of childhood meat eating with delayed 10-word and immediate recall score. Adjusted for age, sex, education, childhood and adulthood socio-economic position and current physical activity, childhood meat eating almost daily, when compared to yearly or never childhood meat eating, was positively associated with delayed recall score (additional number of words recalled out of 10 = 0.22 [95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.31]). Similarly adjusted, childhood meat eating about once a month, about once a week and almost daily were positively associated with immediate recall score (additional number of words recalled out of 30 = 0.38 [0.23-0.54], 0.73 [0.56-0.89] and 0.76 [0.55-0.98] respectively). More frequent childhood meat eating was associated with better cognition through to old age. If confirmed, these results highlight the importance of adequate childhood nutrition and they also emphasise the childhood and adolescent antecedents of adult disease, with corresponding public health implications for healthy aging. © 2010 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124054
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.105
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.071
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Clinical Trial Service Unit, The University of Oxford
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong
The University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

We thank R Peto and ZM Chen of the Clinical Trial Service Unit, The University of Oxford for their support. The Guangzhou Cohort Study investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: XQ Lao, WS Zhang, M Cao, T Zhu, B Liu, CQ Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: CM Schooling, SM McGhee, GM Leung, R Fielding, TH Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P Adab, GN Thomas, Y Peng, KK Cheng (Co-PI).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-19T04:36:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-19T04:36:26Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 25 n. 7, p. 507-516en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0393-2990en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124054-
dc.description.abstractInadequate childhood nutrition is associated with poor short-term academic and cognitive outcomes. Dietary supplementation with meat is associated with better cognitive outcome in children. Whether childhood nutrition has life long effects on cognitive function is unclear. We examined the association of childhood meat eating with adulthood cognitive function in southern China where the older population lived through significant hardship during their early years. Multivariable linear regression was used in a cross-sectional study of 20,086 Chinese men and women aged iobank Cohort Study (phases 2 and 3) 2005-8. We assessed the association of childhood meat eating with delayed 10-word and immediate recall score. Adjusted for age, sex, education, childhood and adulthood socio-economic position and current physical activity, childhood meat eating almost daily, when compared to yearly or never childhood meat eating, was positively associated with delayed recall score (additional number of words recalled out of 10 = 0.22 [95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.31]). Similarly adjusted, childhood meat eating about once a month, about once a week and almost daily were positively associated with immediate recall score (additional number of words recalled out of 30 = 0.38 [0.23-0.54], 0.73 [0.56-0.89] and 0.76 [0.55-0.98] respectively). More frequent childhood meat eating was associated with better cognition through to old age. If confirmed, these results highlight the importance of adequate childhood nutrition and they also emphasise the childhood and adolescent antecedents of adult disease, with corresponding public health implications for healthy aging. © 2010 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0393-2990en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_HK
dc.subjectAgeden_HK
dc.subjectChildhooden_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectCognitionen_HK
dc.subjectCross-sectional studiesen_HK
dc.subjectDementiaen_HK
dc.subjectNutritionen_HK
dc.subject.meshCognition-
dc.subject.meshFood Habits-
dc.subject.meshMeat-
dc.subject.meshMemory Disorders - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveys-
dc.titleIs childhood meat eating associated with better later adulthood cognition in a developing population?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10654-010-9466-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20526800-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2903695-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955553670en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174162-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955553670&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage507en_HK
dc.identifier.epage516en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1573-7284en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280077100009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 01 Dec 2010-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, W=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7376290-

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