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Article: Scaffolding problem-based learning with CSCL tools

TitleScaffolding problem-based learning with CSCL tools
Authors
KeywordsArgumentation tools
Content analysis
CSCL
CSCL tools
Medical education
PBL
Role play
Scaffolding
Visualization tools
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-40521-70-52582798-0,00.html?changeHeader=true
Citation
International Journal Of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 2010, v. 5 n. 3, p. 283-298 How to Cite?
AbstractSmall-group medical problem-based learning (PBL) was a pioneering form of collaborative learning at the university level. It has traditionally been delivered in face-to-face text-based format. With the advancement of computer technology and progress in CSCL, educational researchers are now exploring how to design digitally-implemented scaffolding tools to facilitate medical PBL. The "deteriorating patient" (DP) role play was created as a medical simulation that extends traditional PBL and can be implemented digitally. We present a case study of classroom usage of the DP role play that examines teacher scaffolding of PBL under two conditions: using a traditional whiteboard (TW) and using an interactive whiteboard (IW). The introduction of the IW technology changed the way that the teacher scaffolded the learning. The IW showed the teacher all the information shared within the various subgroups of a class, broadening the basis for informed classroom scaffolding. The visual records of IW usage demonstrated what students understood and reduced the need to structure the task. This allowed more time for engaging students in challenging situations by increasing the complexity of the problem. Although appropriate scaffolding is still based on the teacher's domain knowledge and pedagogy experience, technology can help by expanding the scaffolding choices that an instructor can make in a medical training context. © 2010 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124049
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.2
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.641
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLajoie, SPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWiseman, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-19T04:36:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-19T04:36:02Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 2010, v. 5 n. 3, p. 283-298en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1556-1607en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124049-
dc.description.abstractSmall-group medical problem-based learning (PBL) was a pioneering form of collaborative learning at the university level. It has traditionally been delivered in face-to-face text-based format. With the advancement of computer technology and progress in CSCL, educational researchers are now exploring how to design digitally-implemented scaffolding tools to facilitate medical PBL. The "deteriorating patient" (DP) role play was created as a medical simulation that extends traditional PBL and can be implemented digitally. We present a case study of classroom usage of the DP role play that examines teacher scaffolding of PBL under two conditions: using a traditional whiteboard (TW) and using an interactive whiteboard (IW). The introduction of the IW technology changed the way that the teacher scaffolded the learning. The IW showed the teacher all the information shared within the various subgroups of a class, broadening the basis for informed classroom scaffolding. The visual records of IW usage demonstrated what students understood and reduced the need to structure the task. This allowed more time for engaging students in challenging situations by increasing the complexity of the problem. Although appropriate scaffolding is still based on the teacher's domain knowledge and pedagogy experience, technology can help by expanding the scaffolding choices that an instructor can make in a medical training context. © 2010 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-40521-70-52582798-0,00.html?changeHeader=trueen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learningen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectArgumentation toolsen_HK
dc.subjectContent analysisen_HK
dc.subjectCSCLen_HK
dc.subjectCSCL toolsen_HK
dc.subjectMedical educationen_HK
dc.subjectPBLen_HK
dc.subjectRole playen_HK
dc.subjectScaffoldingen_HK
dc.subjectVisualization toolsen_HK
dc.titleScaffolding problem-based learning with CSCL toolsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLu, J: jingyan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLu, J=rp00930en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11412-010-9092-6en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955054222en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189327-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955054222&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage283en_HK
dc.identifier.epage298en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1556-1615en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283595800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 01 Dec 2010-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, J=24399629600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLajoie, SP=6602435220en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWiseman, J=22956538800en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7497630-

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