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Article: Secondary production and diet of an invasive snail in freshwater wetlands: Implications for resource utilization and competition

TitleSecondary production and diet of an invasive snail in freshwater wetlands: Implications for resource utilization and competition
Authors
KeywordsApple snail
Biomass
Herbivory
Invasive species
Secondary production
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1387-3547
Citation
Biological Invasions, 2010, v. 12 n. 5, p. 1153-1164 How to Cite?
AbstractInvasive species can monopolize resources and thus dominate ecosystem production. In this study we estimated secondary production and diet of four populations of Pomacea canaliculata, a freshwater invasive snail, in wetlands (abandoned paddy, oxbow pond, drainage channel, and river meander) in monsoonal Hong Kong (lat. 22°N). Apple snail secondary production (ash-free dry mass [AFDM]) ranged from 165.9 to 233.3 g m-2 year-1, and varied between seasons. Production was lower during the cool dry northeast monsoon, when water temperatures might have limited growth, but fast growth and recruitment of multiple cohorts were possible throughout much (7-10 months) of the year and especially during the warm, wet southwest monsoon. The diet, as revealed by stomach-content analysis, consisted mainly of detritus and macrophytes, and was broadly consistent among habitats despite considerable variation in the composition and cover of aquatic plants. Apple snail annual production was >10 times greater than production estimates for other benthic macroinvertebrates in Hong Kong (range 0.004-15 g AFDM m-2 year-1, n = 29). Furthermore, annual production estimates for three apple snail populations (i. e. >230 g AFDM m-2 year-1) were greater than published estimates for any other freshwater snails (range 0.002-194 g AFDM m-2 year-1, n = 33), regardless of climatic regime or habitat type. High production by P. canaliculata in Hong Kong was attributable to the topical climate (annual mean ~24°C), permitting rapid growth and repeated reproduction, together with dietary flexibility including an ability to consume a range of macrophytes. If invasive P. canaliculata can monopolize food resources, its high productivity indicates potential for competition with other macroinvertebrate primary consumers. Manipulative experiments will be needed to quantify these impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem function in wetlands, combined with management strategies to prevent further range extension by P. canaliculata. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124014
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.855
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.441
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Environment and Conservation Fund of Hong Kong SAR GovernmentECF/05-06/01
Hong Kong Baptist UniversityFRG/06-07/II-87
Funding Information:

We thank Robert Cowie and Ken Hayes for identifying the apple snail and for providing some useful literature, and two anonymous reviewers for helpful comments on the manuscript. This study was supported by ECF/05-06/01 from Environment and Conservation Fund of Hong Kong SAR Government, and FRG/06-07/II-87 from Hong Kong Baptist University.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwong, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, PKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQiu, JWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-19T04:33:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-19T04:33:14Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiological Invasions, 2010, v. 12 n. 5, p. 1153-1164en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1387-3547en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124014-
dc.description.abstractInvasive species can monopolize resources and thus dominate ecosystem production. In this study we estimated secondary production and diet of four populations of Pomacea canaliculata, a freshwater invasive snail, in wetlands (abandoned paddy, oxbow pond, drainage channel, and river meander) in monsoonal Hong Kong (lat. 22°N). Apple snail secondary production (ash-free dry mass [AFDM]) ranged from 165.9 to 233.3 g m-2 year-1, and varied between seasons. Production was lower during the cool dry northeast monsoon, when water temperatures might have limited growth, but fast growth and recruitment of multiple cohorts were possible throughout much (7-10 months) of the year and especially during the warm, wet southwest monsoon. The diet, as revealed by stomach-content analysis, consisted mainly of detritus and macrophytes, and was broadly consistent among habitats despite considerable variation in the composition and cover of aquatic plants. Apple snail annual production was >10 times greater than production estimates for other benthic macroinvertebrates in Hong Kong (range 0.004-15 g AFDM m-2 year-1, n = 29). Furthermore, annual production estimates for three apple snail populations (i. e. >230 g AFDM m-2 year-1) were greater than published estimates for any other freshwater snails (range 0.002-194 g AFDM m-2 year-1, n = 33), regardless of climatic regime or habitat type. High production by P. canaliculata in Hong Kong was attributable to the topical climate (annual mean ~24°C), permitting rapid growth and repeated reproduction, together with dietary flexibility including an ability to consume a range of macrophytes. If invasive P. canaliculata can monopolize food resources, its high productivity indicates potential for competition with other macroinvertebrate primary consumers. Manipulative experiments will be needed to quantify these impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem function in wetlands, combined with management strategies to prevent further range extension by P. canaliculata. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1387-3547en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Invasionsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsSpringer Science+Business Media B.V.en_HK
dc.subjectApple snailen_HK
dc.subjectBiomassen_HK
dc.subjectHerbivoryen_HK
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_HK
dc.subjectSecondary productionen_HK
dc.titleSecondary production and diet of an invasive snail in freshwater wetlands: Implications for resource utilization and competitionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10530-009-9537-xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952288692en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros179038-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77952288692&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1153en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1164en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1573-1464en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276509400020-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 01 Dec 2010-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, KL=24468722700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, PK=24469501000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, JW=7403309861en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5382224-

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