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Article: Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

TitleReplication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.virologyj.com/home/
Citation
Virology Journal, 2010, v. 7 n. 1, article no. 38 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely mixing vessel for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs). However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia) receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal) and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal) were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results. Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions. The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia receptors alone, the pig is unlikely to be a more appropriate mixing vessel for influenza viruses than humans. We conclude that too little is known on the exact mechanism and on predisposing factors for reassortment to assess the true role of the pig in the emergence of novel influenza viruses. © 2010 Van Poucke et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/123922
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.362
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.166
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
EUCT044220
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the EU funded project FLUPATH (contract CT044220).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Poucke, SGMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNauwynck, HJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVan Reeth, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-07T07:28:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-07T07:28:56Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationVirology Journal, 2010, v. 7 n. 1, article no. 38en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1743-422Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/123922-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely mixing vessel for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs). However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia) receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal) and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal) were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results. Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions. The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia receptors alone, the pig is unlikely to be a more appropriate mixing vessel for influenza viruses than humans. We conclude that too little is known on the exact mechanism and on predisposing factors for reassortment to assess the true role of the pig in the emergence of novel influenza viruses. © 2010 Van Poucke et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.virologyj.com/home/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofVirology Journalen_HK
dc.subject.meshHistocytochemistry-
dc.subject.meshN-Acetylneuraminic Acid - analysis-
dc.subject.meshOrthomyxoviridae - growth and development-
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Virus - analysis-
dc.subject.meshRespiratory System - chemistry - virology-
dc.titleReplication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distributionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1743-422X&volume=7&issue=1&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Replication+of+avian,+human+and+swine+influenza+viruses+in+porcine+respiratory+explants+and+association+with+sialic+acid+distribution-
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM:nicholls@pathology.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1743-422X-7-38en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20158900-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2829537-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77749268058en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros172047-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77749268058&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 38-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 38-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275095100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6678096-

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