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Article: Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits in-vitro Candida biofilm development

TitlePseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits in-vitro Candida biofilm development
Authors
KeywordsBiology
Microbiology
Issue Date2010
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmicrobiol/
Citation
Bmc Microbiology, 2010, p. 125 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Elucidation of the communal behavior of microbes in mixed species biofilms may have a major impact on understanding infectious diseases and for the therapeutics. Although, the structure and the properties of monospecies biofilms and their role in disease have been extensively studied during the last decade, the interactions within mixed biofilms consisting of bacteria and fungi such as Candida spp. have not been illustrated in depth. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the interspecies interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and six different species of Candida comprising C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. dubliniensis in dual species biofilm development. Results: A significant reduction in colony forming units (CFU) of C. parapsilosis (90 min), C. albicans and C. tropicalis (90 min, 24h and 48h), C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata, (24h and 48h) was noted when co-cultured with P. aeruginosa in comparison to their monospecies counterparts (P<0.05). A simultaneous significant reduction in P. aeruginosa numbers grown with C. albicans (90 min and 48h), C. krusei (90 min, 24h and 48h), C. glabrata, (24 h and 48h), and an elevation of P. aeruginosa numbers co-cultured with C. tropicalis (48 h) was noted (P<0.05). When data from all Candida spp. and P. aeruginosa were pooled, highly significant mutual inhibition of biofilm formation was noted (Candida P<0.001, P. aeruginosa P<0.01). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) analyses confirmed scanty architecture in dual species biofilm in spite of dense colonization in monospecies counterparts. Conclusions: P. aeruginosa and Candida in a dual species environment mutually suppress biofilm development, both quantitatively and qualitatively. These findings provide a foundation to clarify the molecular basis of bacterial-fungal interactions, and to understand the pathobiology of mixed bacterial-fungal infections.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/123855
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.581
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.391
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong KongCERG HKU 7624/06M
Funding Information:

Authors would like to acknowledge Dr. Zaw Moe Thein for his advice. This study was supported by the grant of CERG HKU 7624/06M of The University of Hong Kong

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBandara, HMHNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, JYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJin, LJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-05T03:29:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-05T03:29:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Microbiology, 2010, p. 125en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2180en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/123855-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Elucidation of the communal behavior of microbes in mixed species biofilms may have a major impact on understanding infectious diseases and for the therapeutics. Although, the structure and the properties of monospecies biofilms and their role in disease have been extensively studied during the last decade, the interactions within mixed biofilms consisting of bacteria and fungi such as Candida spp. have not been illustrated in depth. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the interspecies interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and six different species of Candida comprising C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. dubliniensis in dual species biofilm development. Results: A significant reduction in colony forming units (CFU) of C. parapsilosis (90 min), C. albicans and C. tropicalis (90 min, 24h and 48h), C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata, (24h and 48h) was noted when co-cultured with P. aeruginosa in comparison to their monospecies counterparts (P<0.05). A simultaneous significant reduction in P. aeruginosa numbers grown with C. albicans (90 min and 48h), C. krusei (90 min, 24h and 48h), C. glabrata, (24 h and 48h), and an elevation of P. aeruginosa numbers co-cultured with C. tropicalis (48 h) was noted (P<0.05). When data from all Candida spp. and P. aeruginosa were pooled, highly significant mutual inhibition of biofilm formation was noted (Candida P<0.001, P. aeruginosa P<0.01). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) analyses confirmed scanty architecture in dual species biofilm in spite of dense colonization in monospecies counterparts. Conclusions: P. aeruginosa and Candida in a dual species environment mutually suppress biofilm development, both quantitatively and qualitatively. These findings provide a foundation to clarify the molecular basis of bacterial-fungal interactions, and to understand the pathobiology of mixed bacterial-fungal infections.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmicrobiol/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsB M C Microbiology. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.subjectBiology-
dc.subjectMicrobiology-
dc.titlePseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits in-vitro Candida biofilm developmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1471-2180&volume=10&issue=article no. 125&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Pseudomonas+aeruginosa+inhibits+in-vitro+Candida+biofilm+development-
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM:rmwatt@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJin, LJ:ljjin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJin, LJ=rp00028en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2180-10-125en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20416106-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2874548-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951144551en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros171960-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issuearticle no. 125-
dc.identifier.spage125en_HK
dc.identifier.epage125en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278216800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBandara, HMHN=35721385900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, JYY=7102167568en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatt, RM=7102907536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, LJ=7403328850en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7081970-

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